Photo News

2011.07.11

(7 years ago)
My red tuna and I

Porth Nanven

(7 years ago)
porth nanven cornwall

Gerard and Frank at PGW

(7 years ago)
Gerad Way and Frank iero at Paris Games Week. Paris, November 2010.They were playing Na Na Na at Guitar Hero for some promotion. Frank was really funny as he was really bad at the game ! Fans were...

Kaleidoscope

(7 years ago)
Nikon D7000 - 105 Macro F2.8 VREnjoy Please comment, I appreciate every feedback !

Zambezi Stretch by Etienne Oosthuizen

(7 years ago)
Zambezi Stretch by Etienne OosthuizenTuesday, 12th July 2011Join Earth Shots on Facebook.

Picc

(7 years ago)

Ilford rapid fix, fix time for Tmax 400 (TMY-2) My test results

(7 years ago)
There were several people asking about this just recently. I had a chance to test the clearing time of TMY-2 in 120 format. With Ilford Rapid fix...

Jouissance

(7 years ago)
"woman examining man" ~helmut newton.yes guys, we are no longer "girls" while making you the object of sexuality.

Alan S. Wicks joined Brandon Louden's group

(7 years ago)
Alan S. Wicks joined Brandon Louden's groupPhotoshop This PhotoThis is a place for you to show off your Photo EDITING skills.The idea is for a photo to be placed for everyone to work on in their own way, in whatever software you use to edit photos. Post as many as you would like too.

MSNBC sports gallery a winner

(7 years ago)
MSNBC has made some fine image selections for the latest edition of the Week in Sports Pictures.

On Assignment: Inside the Soft Box

(7 years ago)
Shooting locavore and farm-to-table photos for a HoCo project took me to nearby Triadelphia Lake View Farm, where I photographed raised lettuce beds. They literally grow the lettuce in terraced roof gutters on tables, which extends the growing season, uses less water and frustrates the resident bunny population.I've shot in greenhouses before, using the diffuse plastic as a ready-made light source. But this way you don't get detail in the sky. If the backlit plastic is your light source, the light is gonna be diffuse and the plastic is gonna be white. However, in this case I wanted a little more punch to the light and some color in the sky. Solution: Turn the whole fricken' thing into a soft box and shoot inside the box…__________Actually, I was not planning on lighting the lettuce farm this way at first. I was traveling pretty light for these shoots, with a single body, coupla zooms and three SB-800s. But when I am shooting outside in daytime I always throw a big light kit into the trunk just in case -- a Profoto B600 and head, big stand, Softlighter II, Magnum reflector and a PC cord.This way I can either work light or overpower the sun if I like. In the latter case, the SB's can serve double duty as accent lights.As soon as I got there and did a few ambient-only test shots, I knew I wanted to create some harder light and leave detail in the sky. So rather than task light Jenn watering the lettuce I choose to blast the Profoto right through the greenhouse roof from the[..]

Gear Basics: Choosing and Using Soft Light Modifiers

(7 years ago)
With the gazillion or so soft light mods out there, it is easy to be overwhelmed by the choices available. And while I have probably shot with more of them that I would care to admit, there are four soft mods that I go back to again and again.As it happens, these four are reasonably priced, too. (Which may well be what attracted me to them in the first place, of course.)Keep reading for four good choices for soft light that won't break the bank.__________Soft is RelativeSo, which of the light sources above is the softest? The one in the back, right?Not necessarily. The 60" source in back is not as soft at 10 feet away from your subject as the 8x9" source is at 10 inches away. A good rule of thumb to remember is that a light source is soft when it looks large to your subject. This nets out the two variables of size and distance. Example: Even a bare speedlight looks soft to a subject only a couple inches away. Long story short, if you want soft light you will have to consider the working distance at which you'll be using it. The further back your light source, the larger your light mod will have to be.So front to back, here is the straight dope on the four mods pictured above.1. The LumiQuest Soft Box IIIAt 8x9", the LumiQuest SB-III can be very soft -- as long as you are working the light literally right up next to the subject. Case in point, this headshot of Ben I did for an ad for the SB-III when it first came out.With a flat front edge, the light is easy to feather. This[..]

BC3 Assignment #1: Profile

(7 years ago)
Welcome to the first assignment of Boot Camp 3. While this is of course a lighting boot camp, the light itself will be secondary to the photos. And the photos will be secondary to the purpose.The purpose for BC3 will be to force you out into you community in search of well-crafted photos that actually have something to say about your community.__________The First AssignmentAssignment number one is both simple and difficult. Simple in that its physical subject matter is a person. Specifically, the assignment is for a tight portrait. One that could be used as a cover image or perhaps a full-page inside lede.But difficult in that you actually need to find and reach out to someone relevant to your community and photograph them. Someone who makes the community more interesting, or might have a story to tell. Someone who merits the thought that goes into a quality photo.You'll have to work fast, because the deadline is 12 days from now. Which means that you should ID someone (and a fallback, probably) pretty darn ASAP. You'll need to secure permission to shoot them, find a location, photograph them and turn in the photo before deadline. (More details below.)Put some thought into your subject. It might be a community leader. (But don't aim too high -- they might be harder to schedule). Or a performing artist. Or a worker who sends most of their income to support their family in another country. Or someone at a local startup. Or a local craftsperson. Figuring out who to shoot will[..]

Brad Trent for Barron's

(7 years ago)
Brad Trent shot the mid-year Barron's roundtable issue, this time with a global investing theme. He shot the montage separately, using segmented backgrounds from … Ikea? It gets the full On Assignment treatment, with lighting setups, etc. on his blog. Classic Brad: he turned in his lighting setup shots to the paper. And they ran them…__________See also: Brad Trent's Fake Reality Portraits-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Finn O'Hara: Wayne Gretzky's First Skates

(7 years ago)
Toronto-based photographer Finn O'Hara was assigned to shoot The Great One's first skates for ESPN The Magazine, and his take included this shot on pure white.O'Hara used light rather than a Photoshop cutout to get the pure white background in-camera. His blog post gives a good look at a textbook blow-away white setup on location for a three-dimensional object. But O'Hara doesn't go into any how-and-why detail. So let's do that here. __________This is something we had to do on a weekly basis for Monday Morning, a small biz pub where I was a staffer in the '80's. As in pre-Photoshop. And honestly, I think the results are much better doing it this way than with even the best pixel-perfect Photoshop cutout.Two apple boxes and a sheet of glass (or plexi) give you multiple planes on which to light both the subject and white background. Shooting straight down from a tall tripod makes gravity work for you. (You can do this with less height and on a tilt, but it can be a pain in the ass.)The white paper beneath the subject is slightly over-lit with a couple of strip boxes, leaving what would be a pure silhouette if the skates were unlit. You have to overlight it to get pure white. But don't go too far or you will kill your contrast with internal reflections. The black cards spread around the skates on the plexi serve a dual purpose. They gobo the strip boxes and excess white background blowback, which would otherwise kill contrast. They also give a black specular to anything shiny[..]

BC3: Introduction

(7 years ago)
Welcome to Boot Camp III. It has been two years since the last boot camp, so I thought a little background and intro was in order before the first assignment drops next week.If you are thinking of participating (and I encourage you to do so) keep reading for info on how to participate, rules, prizes, etc.__________The AssignmentsThere will be five assignments, designed to nudge at least some of you out of your comfort zones and force you out into your community to make some photos. The assignments are loosely based on a local project I am shooting, and we'll be talking about that more as we go. Plus, I will be participating in several of the assignments.Hopefully, this might give some of you the beginnings of a local-based project of your own. Who knows.The shoots will be subject-driven. Actual lighting technique will take a back seat to the overall photo, as it should. A big part of lighting is the simple act of getting past it and concentrating on the photo rather than the light. Lighting is just a tool; a means to an end.EnteringAs I said in the preview post, you will have to be a member of Flickr and of The Strobist Flickr Group to participate. So if you have not done so, please take a moment do this right now. Flickr has a wait period before you can tag photos, which you'll need to be able to do.To enter a photo, you'll add it to the Strobist Flickr group AND tag it with the appropriate code given for each assignment. Since your photo will be in the Strobist pool, it[..]

Air Profoto

(7 years ago)
©Claes AxstålNo, not Profoto's proprietary Air-sync remote system. But rather photographer Claes Axstål's using twin 7b's with Magnum reflectors to shoot air-to-air photos of planes in flight. Just a little 2400 watt-second Friday fun, courtesy Ron Egatz on the RSS-worthy Profoto blog.Having lit aircraft in flight while shooting from the ground using only a few low-power speedlights, I'd love to see a combination of the two techniques. After all, Axstål is certainly driving enough power to set off some slaved interior lights, too…-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

A Flash in the Pan: Bare-Bulb DIY Beauty Dish

(7 years ago)
From the south of India comes a new take on the DIY speedlight beauty dish, courtesy Strobist reader Sinu Kumar. Unlike studio flashes, most speedlights have a tiny, captive flash tube with a reflector already built into the housing. And if you want a true beauty dish design you'll need an omnidirectional light source. So you first have to convert the beam light from a speedlight into a more omnidirectional bare bulb. Most people do this by diffusing the speedlight with a dome, or scrambling the light with a convex mirror. Both of which, of course, eat light.Not so Kumar's design. He actually removed the bare flash tube from inside a speedlight and mounted it in the dish. Bonus points for the material chosen for the tube-holding assembly, too.Before the link, a warning: DO NOT try this project unless you know what you are doing. Here, there be dragons -- or at least some very high voltages. And if you do, please insulate the flash tube leads. It scares me just to look at them exposed like that, Sinu.Warnings given, the sub-$10.00 bare bulb beauty dish is here. -30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

On Assignment: Mathieu Young, Moonlighting in Cambodia

(7 years ago)
When I first saw Mathieu Young's photos of rechargeable Moonlights from Cambodia, I admired both the photos and the lighting. And then I thought, how exactly does a commercial/advertising photographer from L.A. end up in a fishing village with no electricity halfway around the world shooting solar LED lamps?Both, ahead.__________Self-Generate.If there is one theme you will see me beat to death on this blog, it is the value of self-generated work. I do not know a single successful photographer who does not in some way use self-generated work to kickstart both their creative process and their portfolio.Mathieu Young is no exception. He's pushed a cart with a Profoto 7b 20 miles on foot across LA, photographing the people he met along the way. He's lived in his van to photograph a story on a tent city. He has even picked up and headed to East Africa in search of self-generated photos.The stories start either with the seed of an idea or meeting someone who can grant access. Then comes research. Lots of research. Finally, the shooting part.The photos from these self-gen projects have lead to more (and better) commercial work, to the point where he now actually has to schedule time to go out and shoot for himself. Which is how he found himself in Cambodia for a month last February, in search of nonprofits who could use his services. The trip was open-ended and serendipitous. Once there, he ended up volunteering to shoot for TEDxPhnomPehn and was able to network with fellow[..]

Robert Caplin's Light Fare

(7 years ago)
So this is turning out to be a foodie-themed week. What a great idea, above, from NYC-based photog Robert Caplin. I am so stealing this, like, right now.I'm eating my way through Howard County, shooting as I go (somebody's gotta do it) and it doesn't get much simpler for shooting food than a macro lens and a palm-sized LED light. I think my 3x6" LitePad just earned it's way into my regular kit.-30-(Via ISO 1200)__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

On Assignment: Hi-Def Asparagus

(7 years ago)
If you ever get to Barcelona, you owe it to yourself to go to the Picasso Museum. I never really understood the guy's work until I visited there in 1996. I wish every major artist had a museum like Pablo's.As a photographer, it resonated with me because it was all about finding your style. Which, by the way, is exactly how the Picasso Museum relates to the asparagus photo above.____________The museum is laid out chronologically, and that's the special sauce. By walking through Picasso's work -- in order -- you experience his life as an artist. And during that visit, you watch him try (and usually master) then reject pretty much every significant painting style that pre-existed him before finally settling on his own. All you can do as a photographer is to watch, slack-jawed, as the transformation happens.You could do a lot worse as a role model. And I have long-adopted that process as a photographer: Study the styles and techniques of others, then try to adapt/mash-up/evolve things to discover my own style.That's exactly how my style has evolved with respect to product photography. And now that I have a style (technique?) that I like, I especially enjoy using it on objects where the style might seem a little out of genre.A lot of the products I shoot tend to be either tech or photographic in nature. The arm above, from an editorial shoot (see 'On Assignment' here) is a good example of what I enjoy doing. But I also do a lot of product shots of lighting gear for this blog,[..]

Wanted: EU and Asia Correspondents

(7 years ago)
UPDATE: Applications are now closed. I am reviewing them now.Thanks,DH__________Strobist's readership is worldwide. But its coverage is … too Americentric. That's going to change.Strobist.com is looking for two enterprising correspondents, one each in Europe and Asia, to find and profile/BTS photographers doing kickass light. If you are the right person for this gig, you probably already look up photogs' websites from photo credits and/or have an inspiration folder in your browser -- without even being paid to do so.If this sounds like you, keep reading.__________The ideal correspondent would be:• A working photographer - preferably commercial or editorial• An experienced blogger• Fluent in English• Intensely curious about, and inspired by, photographers doing amazing workThis is not an exclusive arrangement. If you are already blogging as a contributor on another platform, that should not be a problem.What's In It For You?You will be paid per post. You won't get rich, but the amount it is certainly on the high end for this medium.Your work will be read by hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Your byline will link back to your own blog or photo site, which will bring meaningful exposure within the photo community.This will be an immersive experience. As a team, we will work together on voice, demographics, organic SEO, editorial budgeting, owning your beat and creating strong, original content on a regular basis.If this still sounds like you, here is[..]

Today's Lunch Special: Refired Beams*

(7 years ago)
Just a little out of the box thinking for your Thursday lunch break.Hollywood-based photographer David Myrick [website|twitter] had a pretty cool idea when shooting stills for the electronic group, The Glitch Mob: Strobe them on white, then dress them in white -- and then rephotograph them while projecting them … onto themselves.I can't quite put my finger on why I like it. I just like it.__________*Yes, I do realize that may be the single-worst headline pun ever spawned by this blog. Apologize? Never. I live for bad puns.-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Rethinking the Freelance Model

(7 years ago)
I'm guest posting on over on Scott Kelby's blog today, about evolving the traditional freelance model into one that is more proactive and entrepreneurial. For those of you interested in that sort of thing, it is here.-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Lighting in Layers Update: Wider Availability, Download Version and a Trailer

(7 years ago)
First, thanks for the kind words from many of you who already have purchased Lighting in Layers. We worked very hard on the project; the notes, comments and reviews are much appreciated. A trailer has now been posted to give people a better idea of what LiL is about. The hard copy DVDs are now available at Midwest Photo, Adorama, Amazon, Gulf Photo Plus and Souq.com. And … the downloadable ($99.95 USD) version is live, here. I know many non-US readers were waiting on this. It is the same drag-and-drop (iPhone/iPad/iPod, laptop, Android, etc.) file set that is included along with the $159.95 hard copy version. They are 640x480 .mp4 files, encoded via h.264 for maximum compatibility file size economy (2.9Gb total) for portable media players. PLEASE NOTE: If you want to test the CODEC on your machine first, you can download a short vignette in the exact same format via Mediafire, for free.__________Alas, the subtitled version is taking far longer (grrr…) than expected. I very much hoped to have it ready by now but the video producer is still working on it. Apologies, and I will post as soon as it is up.__________Full information on Lighting in Layers is here; after-the-fact Flickr discussion thread for viewers, here.-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Announcing: BC3:2L

(7 years ago)
It's been a while since our last lighting Boot Camp, so what the hell. Let's dust off the speedlights and give them a little workout.As with previous bootcamps, there will be assignments, reviews, people complaining that they can't figure out how to post photos to Flickr -- and, of course, prizes. And given the experience range of readership on the site, we're gonna do something just a little different this time, too. Each assignment will be limited to using a maximum of two speedlights, so a certain someone won't have an undue advantage.Thus, Boot Camp III: Two Lights, or, BC3:2L.Speaking of Flickr, if you want to publicly post to the BC3:2L results page, you will need to join Flickr. It is free. Go head and do it now, to give your account long enough to get past any waiting period so you can post to groups, etc. If your country blocks Flickr, either use Firefox and find an appropriate "unblocker" plug-in, or grab some pine. (That's baseball speak for "sit this one out.")The first BC3:2L assignment drops later next month.-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Sidewalk Art

(7 years ago)
Food for thought: Next time you clamp up a few speedlights on a public street, it could lead you all the way to the state Supreme Court. Got your attention? Keep reading...__________Earlier this week, my friend JoeyL tweeted about NYC photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and it really got me thinking.A few years ago DiCorcia clamped strobes up under a scaffolding on a New York City sidewalk, thus turning the space into his own private public studio. He then photographed people as they passed through, making a series of beautiful portraits that were at once banal and thought-provoking.And that's where the interesting starts…__________His video, above, explains it pretty clearly. I watched it, did a little Googling and spent the next half hour thinking about it -- ending up with ever more unanswered questions as I went.First off, the flash geek in me loves that he did this with a few Vivitar 285(!!) speedlights. I would have thought this was a bigger production values thing, a la the amazing work of Gregory Crewdson. But when you think about it, under the scaffolding it is pretty dark, so you don't need a lot of light. And the small strobes hide nicely.Such an elegant approach, creating something so layered and interesting with such a minimal amount of gear.Second, what an interesting way to photograph lit portraits of people without having to, you know, actually talk with them. Personally, I have never had a problem in that area. But I know some of you introverted readers[..]

Lighting 101 Update: Evolving Umbrellas

(7 years ago)
One long-overdue item on my To-Do list has been to add more current info to some of the Lighting 101 posts that have become a little dated.High on that list was the post on umbrellas. My thinking on the cheap, portable light sources has changed drastically since Lighting 101 debuted in 2006. As such, I have added a significant update to the original post.-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Two Speedlight Grid Spot Systems: Flashpoint and Rogue

(7 years ago)
If you need to create a tight beam of light, it's as easy as wrapping a little cardboard around your flash head. Bam -- instant cheapo snoot, to go.But what you'll find with a snoot is that the edges of the beam can be a little abrupt. If you want a nice, feathered transition to that edge, you'll want a grid.I have long been a user of the Honl grids. But there are a couple of other interesting grids floating around that deserve consideration, depending on your particular needs.Inside, a quick look at speedlight grids from Flashpoint and Rogue.__________One key feature both grids have in common, which makes the pretty interesting: They are both convertible, offering multiple beam spreads. This is a neat development, and the Flashpoint and Rogue grids go about it in completely different ways.The Flashpoint Snoot GridLeading off is Flashpoint's version. Flashpoint is an Adorama house brand, so one has to assume this is something they had especially created OEM, just for them, in the magical far east.Weighing in at $35, it is actually a snoot (complete with those rougher beam edges) with two grid attachments (for feathered edges) that cap onto the front. So you have a three-way flexibility designed right into the system.IN SYNC:1. Good build quality. This thing is metal, and will take some abuse.2. Multiple beam widths, done with two small caps that you swap out.OUT OF SYNC:1. It's big, and does not collapse down -- a little bigger than a loaded-up, jumbo-sized waffle cone.[..]

Q&A: Thomas Hunter

(7 years ago)
Lotsa good questions popped up in the comments section of last week's On Assignment: Thomas Hunter post. Fair enough. Hit the jump for the A's to your Q's__________Q: The kicker on his face - is that coming from the 'photoshopped' light, or the one at the opposite end of the piano?A: Yep, a little confusion about that one -- coupla people asked. Thought it was obvious with the setup shot included, but obviously not. Sorry about that.The light at far right is the one lighting the background. It needs to be relatively far away to get a more even throw on the background. The light behind the piano (which I took out in post) is the little kicker on his face. That does not have to light evenly across distance, so it can be closer and more targeted.__________Q: If I may add something, don't you think the front of the piano is a bit too dark and dull? Personally, I would have though of lighting it, maybe from camera right at an angle, to bring out its shiny surface and shape. Or maybe you didn't want to bring it up to the viewer's attention and to compete with the player. Can you explain a bit more about your choice here?A: You are right about it competing, IMO. Totally subjective, but I wanted it to be more of a shot of a pianist, rather than a piano.And that's a black-lacquered piano, so even lit, it is gonna be black. If I wanted detail on the piano, I would hit it with a big, soft light -- probably from camera right. Nice big source (maybe a speedlight thru a white sheet) and[..]

If Ikea Made a Ring Flash

(7 years ago)
Is there a hole in your life that only a light with a hole in it can fill?Are you pining for a ring flash but have neither the money for an Orbis nor the DIY skills to roll your own?You may be in luck. The folks over at DIY Photography have just come out with a hybid version. And, as the headline suggested, this is one you assemble yourself.It's made out of the same flexible vinyl material you'll find in folders and binders, so it is reasonably sturdy but by no means indestructible. I have played with one, and the quality of light is very good. (There is progressive ND filtration at the bottom and the light levels are pretty consistent around the ring.)It is a universal (or nearly so) fit. It's also cheap, at $25. The only thing it doesn't come with is an allen wrench and a weird, quasi descriptive Ikea name like Reng Flösh, or maybe Reh Dyye.__________:: DIY Lighting Kit Ring Flash ::-30-__________ New! Watch the Lighting in Layers Trailer:

Tycho ISO50

(7 years ago)
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