Technology News

Peugeot's new hybrid concept is half SUV, half sports car

(48 minutes ago)
If you had any lingering concerns that hybrid cars were boring, Peugeot just smashed them to bits. Its new Quartz crossover concept blends the muscular, offroad-ready profile of a small SUV with green powerplants and aerodynamics that could give...

'Reactive' Development Turns 2.0

(One hour ago)
electronic convict writes First there was "agile" development. Now there's a new software movement—called 'reactive' development—that sets out principles for building resilient and failure-tolerant applications for cloud, mobile, multicore and Web-scale systems. ReadWrite's Matt Asay sat down with Jonas Bonér, the author of the Reactive Manifesto (just released in version 2.0), for a discussion of what, exactly, the reactive movement aims to fix in software development and how we get there from here. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Photographer extensively tests new iPhone cameras in Iceland, praises low light improvements (Austin Mann)

(2 hours ago)
Austin Mann:Photographer extensively tests new iPhone cameras in Iceland, praises low light improvements  —  iPhone 6 Plus Camera Review: Iceland  —  v  —  This year I had the opportunity to be at Apple's Keynote where they announced the iPhone 6, 6 Plus and the Watch.

Is Alibaba Comparable To a US Company?

(4 hours ago)
lpress writes Alibaba is this weeks hot news — they have had a lengthy PR campaign (preceded by a documentary film) followed by a record-setting stock offering. After a day of trading Alibaba's market capitalization was comparable to that of established tech giants. But, there are cultural and structural differences between Alibaba and U.S. companies. Alibaba is tightly woven into a complex fabric of personal, corporate and government organization relationships. The same can be said of information technology companies in Singapore. Is owning a share of, say, Apple, conceptually the same as owning a share of Alibaba? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft will double your free OneDrive storage if you auto-upload photos

(4 hours ago)
Microsoft has been rather generous with free OneDrive storage lately, and that doesn't seem to be changing anytime soon. Now Redmond is bumping the previous gratis 15GB up by 100 percent, to 30GB. What's the catch? There isn't much of one, really....

Oculus lets you tinker with the code and design of its first VR headset

(5 hours ago)
If you've ever wanted to modify a virtual reality headset (or even create one from scratch), Oculus VR just gave you a big head start on your project. The Facebook-owned firm has opened up the code, mechanical elements and design for its first VR...

Instapaper goes freemium, updates iOS app with single tap article saving and user profiles (Jordan Crook/TechCrunch)

(5 hours ago)
Jordan Crook / TechCrunch:Instapaper goes freemium, updates iOS app with single tap article saving and user profiles  —  Instapaper Goes Freemium With Big iOS Redesign  —  Instapaper, bringing bookmarks into the future, has just launched a big redesign of the iOS version of the app with loads of new features and a brand new business model.

Oculus Rift's new prototype brings out the best in virtual reality

(6 hours ago)
Presence. It's the ability of VR headsets to fool your mind and body into thinking that you are actually in a virtual world, and that experience is what Oculus seeks to deliver with its latest prototype. Codenamed Crescent Bay, it's an evolution of...

Researchers Report Largest DNA Origami To Date

(7 hours ago)
MTorrice (2611475) writes Bioengineers can harness DNA's remarkable ability to self-assemble to build two- and three-dimensional nanostructures through DNA origami. Until now, researchers using this approach have been limited to building structures that are tens of square nanometers in size. Now a team reports the largest individual DNA origami structures to date, which reach sizes of hundreds of square nanometers. What's more, they have developed a less expensive way to synthesize the DNA strands needed, overcoming a tremendous obstacle to scaling up the technology. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Emails Cast Unflattering Light On Internal Politics of Obamacare Website Rollo

(8 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes with this report from The Verge linking to and excerpting from a newly released report created for a committee in the U.S. House of Representatives, including portions of eight "damning emails" that offer an unflattering look at the rollout of the Obamacare website. The Government Office of Accountability released a report earlier this week detailing the security flaws in the site, but a report from the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform released yesterday is even more damning. Titled, "Behind the Curtain of the HealthCare.gov Rollout," the report fingers the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which oversaw the development of the site, and its parent Department of Health and Human Services. "Officials at CMS and HHS refused to admit to the public that the website was not on track to launch without significant functionality problems and substantial security risks," the report says. "There is also evidence that the Administration, to this day, is continuing its efforts to shield ongoing problems with the website from public view." Writes the submitter: "The evidence includes emails that show Obamacare officials more interested in keeping their problems from leaking to the press than working to fix them. This is both both a coverup and incompetence." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Legal challenges could threaten the business models of the on-demand startups relying on independent contractors (Kevin Roose/New York Magazine)

(9 hours ago)
Kevin Roose / New York Magazine:Legal challenges could threaten the business models of the on-demand startups relying on independent contractors  —  Does Silicon Valley Have a Contract-Worker Problem?  —  An examination of tech's favorite labor model.  —  Shares … Earlier this year, I hired a house cleaner.

Washington DC To Return To Automatic Metro Trains

(9 hours ago)
Bruce66423 (1678196) writes with news of interest to anyone with reason to ride mass transit in the U.S., specifically on the D.C. Metro system: After a crash some five years ago, automatic operation was abandoned. Now however replacement of 'faulty' modules means that moving the whole system on to automatic operation can happen. One quote is depressing: "And because trains regularly lurch to a halt a few feet short of where they should be at platforms, Metrorail riders have grown accustomed to hearing an announcement while they're waiting to board: 'Stand clear. Train moving forward.'" That never happens on the London underground with human operators? What's wrong with American drivers? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New "Crescent Bay" VR Headset Revealed and Demo'd At Oculus Connect

(10 hours ago)
Oculus Rift revealed today its new 'Crescent Bay' prototype wearable display, at its inaugural Oculus Connect conference. (You can find more in the company's blog too.) From Gamasutra's coverage: The new headset has 360 degree tracking and integrated audio, as well as improved performance that allows better presence, says Iribe. It has higher resolution and a better refresh rate than even its recent DK2 headset. It's also much lighter than earlier prototypes. The company has also licensed technology from RealSpace 3-D for improved 3D audio on Oculus moving forward. Audio is becoming a priority for the company, [CEO Brendan] ]Iribe said. Road to VR has a gushing hands-on review: One of the stand-out demos put me in front of an alien on some sort of Moon-like world. The alien was looking at me and speaking in an unfamiliar tongue. When I moved my head, its gaze followed me. Its big and detailed eyes, combined with reaction to me as I moved, imbued it with a sense of living that was really cool. Spaceships flew over head and drew my gaze behind me, leading me to look at some incredibly detailed scenery. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Is Google's Non-Tax Based Public School Funding Cause For Celebration?

(11 hours ago)
theodp (442580) writes "Google's "flash-funding" of teachers' projects via DonorsChoose continues to draw kudos from grateful mayors of the nation's largest cities. The latest comes from Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto (fresh from a Google-paid stay at the Google Zeitgeist resort), who joined Google officials at Taylor Allderdice HS, where Google announced it was 'flash funding' all Pittsburgh area teachers' crowd-funding campaigns on DonorsChoose.org. DonorsChoose reports that Google spent $64,657 to fund projects for 10,924 Pittsburgh kids. While the not-quite-$6-a-student is nice, it does pale by comparison to the $56,742 Google is ponying up to send one L.A. teacher's 34 students to London and Paris and the $35,858 it's spending to take another L.A. teacher's 52 kids to NYC, Gettysburg, and DC. So, is Google's non-tax based public school funding — which includes gender-based funding as well as "begfunding" — cause for celebration?" Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ex-employees: Home Depot slow to react to security concerns, despite warnings as early as 2008 (New York Times)

(12 hours ago)
New York Times:Ex-employees: Home Depot slow to react to security concerns, despite warnings as early as 2008  —  Ex-Employees Say Home Depot Left Data Vulnerable  —  The risks were clear to computer experts inside Home Depot: The home improvement chain, they warned for years, might be easy prey for hackers.

Ask Slashdot: Alternate Software For Use On Smartboards?

(12 hours ago)
SmarterThanMe (1679358) writes Teacher here, you can call me Mr. SmarterThanMe. I have a fancy smartboard installed in my room. Smartboards allow me to show students a whole range of other stuff other than just whatever I'm writing. I can prepare instructions and activities before the lesson and just move through the boards. I can pull up some students' work and display it through the projector. I can bring up some stimulus for use in a writing task. So much better than blackboards. Except the software that comes bundled with this particular brand of smartboard is ridiculously clunky. Without naming this particular piece of software, and highlighting its shortfalls, has anyone got any suggestions on alternatives (open source or otherwise)? The main features that I'd like are: Handwriting recognition The ability to make and use templates Grids or guides or *something* to be able to teach measurement I have gold star stickers for any good suggestions. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft pushes back the Xbox One's launch in China

(12 hours ago)
Bad news if you were hoping to pick up an Xbox One in Beijing next week: Microsoft has just delayed the game system's launch in China from September 23rd to sometime before the end of the year. The company isn't saying just prompted the last-minute...

The "Oculus Platform" Marketplace For Virtual Reality Apps Coming This Fall (Josh Constine/TechCrunch)

(12 hours ago)
Josh Constine / TechCrunch:The “Oculus Platform” Marketplace For Virtual Reality Apps Coming This Fall  —  Oculus announced the “Oculus Platform” store for developers to distribute their virtual reality apps and experiences today at the Oculus Connect conference.  Starting this fall on the Samsung Gear VR made by Oculus …

Video Released, Crowdfunding Underway For Axiom Open Source Cinema Camera

(13 hours ago)
New submitter atagunov writes "Video clips have been released as crowdfunding starts for the world first open source cinematic videocam. "I am a filmmaker myself ... I would like to have powerful tools that I know to have full control over and that I can tune and tweak," says Sebastian Pichelhofer of Apertus. He is working on the Axiom Beta, the 2nd generation Apertus videocam, fully open sourced under GPL and OHL. It's not cheap compared to consumer-grade cameras, but being not-cheap hasn't stopped people from snapping up Joel Rubenstein's Digital Bolex. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Oculus Reveals Its New "Crescent Bay" Developer Kit With 360-Degree Head Tracking And Headphones (Josh Constine/TechCrunch)

(14 hours ago)
Josh Constine / TechCrunch:Oculus Reveals Its New “Crescent Bay” Developer Kit With 360-Degree Head Tracking And Headphones  —  Oculus gave the world the first look at its new developer kit Crescent Bay today at Oculus' Connect conference, which you can watch live here.  Crescent Bay has a faster frame rate …

Why You Can't Manufacture Like Apple

(14 hours ago)
HughPickens.com writes Medium reports that although many startups want to design something that mimics the fit and finish of an Apple product, it's a good way to go out of business. "What happened when Apple wanted to CNC machine a million MacBook bodies a year? They bought 10k CNC machines to do it. How about when they wanted to laser drill holes in MacBook Pros for the sleep light but only one company made a machine that could drill those 20 m holes in aluminum? It bought the company that made the machines and took all the inventory. And that time when they needed batteries to fit into a tiny machined housing but no manufacturer was willing to make batteries so thin? Apple made their own battery cells. From scratch." Other things that Apple often does that can cause problems for a startup include white plastic (which is the most difficult color to mold), CNC machining at scale (too expensive), Laser drilled holes (far more difficult than it may seem), molded plastic packaging (recycled cardboard is your friend), and 4-color, double-walled, matte boxes + HD foam inserts (It's not unusual for them to cost upwards of $12/unit at scale. And then they get thrown away.). "If you see a feature on an Apple device you want to copy, try to find it on another company's product. If you do, it's probably okay to design into your product. Otherwise, lower your expectations. I assure you it'll be better for your startup." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The next Oculus Rift headset is 'Crescent Bay' and sports built-in audio

(14 hours ago)
Oculus VR has a new headset. CEO Brendan Iribe showed the prototype, dubbed Crescent Bay, off today at the first Oculus Connect conference. It has built-in audio, it's lighter and packs 360-degree motion tracking. Developing......

Aether's Cone speaker is a fresh spin on music streaming

(14 hours ago)
The first HiFi I had all to myself was a hand-me-down Sony music center (something like this). It was a mix of faux-wood panels and brushed metal, with three media options: cassette, vinyl and radio. Then the '90s mainstay "all-in-one" HiFi (and CD!)...

Star Wars Producers Want a 'DroneShield' To Prevent Leaks On Set

(15 hours ago)
Jason Koebler writes Over the last couple of weeks, people have been flying drones over Pinewood Studios, where Star Wars Episode VII is being filmed. That made waves last week, but, perhaps most interestingly, the studio ordered a "DroneShield" back in June anticipating the drone problem. According to the company, a DroneShield can provide email and SMS warnings if it detects a helicopters or drone. In any case, the folks over at DroneShield say that Pinewood Studios never actually got the product: The State Department keeps close tabs on products like these that are shipped overseas, and the company's export application still hasn't gone through. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The 10 phones that fueled the big-screen revolution

(15 hours ago)
It's safe to say that Steve Jobs was off the mark when he declared that no one would buy big smartphones -- they've become popular enough that Apple itself is now making large iPhones. But how did these supersized devices escape their niche status to...

NVIDIA Launches Maxwell-Based GeForce GTX 980 and GeForce GTX 970 GPUs

(16 hours ago)
MojoKid (1002251) writes NVIDIA has launched two new high-end graphics cards based on their latest Maxwell architecture. The GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are based on Maxwell and replace NVIDIA's current high-end offerings, the GeForce GTX 780 Ti, GTX 780, and GTX 770. NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are somewhat similar as the cards share the same 4GB frame buffer and GM204 GPU, but the GTX 970's GPU is clocked a bit lower and features fewer active Streaming Multiprocessors and CUDA cores. The GeForce GTX 980's GM204 GPU has all of its functional blocks enabled. The fully-loaded GeForce GTX 980 GM204 GPU has a base clock of 1126MHz and a Boost clock of 1216MHz. The GTX 970 clocks in with a base clock of 1050MHz and Boost clock of 1178MHz. The 4GB of video memory on both cards is clocked at a blisteringly-fast 7GHz (effective GDDR5 data rate). NVIDIA was able to optimize the GM204's power efficiency, however, by tweaking virtually every part of the GPU. NVIDIA claims that Maxwell SMs (Streaming Multiprocessors) offer double the performance of GK104 and double the perf per watt as well. NVIDIA has also added support for new features, namely Dynamic Super Resolution (DSR), Multi-Frame Sampled Anti-Aliasing (MFAA), and Voxel Global Illumination (VXGI). Performance-wise, the GeForce GTX 980 is the fastest single-GPU powered graphics card ever tested. The GeForce GTX 970 isn't as dominant overall, but its performance was impressive nonetheless. The GeForce GTX 970 typically[..]

Rocket Internet CEO stands to lift stake via options: report

(16 hours ago)
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Oliver Samwer, chief executive and co-founder of Rocket Internet is in a position to increase his stake in the German venture capital firm under a stock options program that will be part of its planned stock market listing, a German magazine report said on Saturday.

Microsoft delays Xbox One launch in China from September 23 to sometime later this year (Taylor Soper/GeekWire)

(16 hours ago)
Taylor Soper / GeekWire:Microsoft delays Xbox One launch in China from September 23 to sometime later this year  —  Microsoft delays Xbox One launch in China  —  Gamers in China hoping to get their hands on the Xbox One will have to wait a little longer than expected.  Microsoft announced late Friday that …

Why the iPhone 6 Has the Same Base Memory As the iPhone 5

(17 hours ago)
Lucas123 writes When the iPhone 5 was launched two years ago, the base $199 (with wireless plan) model came with 16GB of flash memory. Fast forward to this week when the iPhone 6 was launched with the same capacity. Now consider that the cost of 16GB of NAND flash has dropped by more than 13% over the past two years. So why would Apple increase capacity on its $299 model iPhone 6 to 64GB (eliminating the 32GB model), but but keep the 16GB in the $199 model? The answer may lie in the fact that the 16GB iPhone is, and has been, by far the best selling model. IHS analyst Fang Zhang believes Apple is using that to push users to its iCloud storage service. Others believe restricting storage capacity allows Apple to afford the new features, like NFC and biometrics. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

​Google for iOS updated with TV recommendations, better transit cards

(18 hours ago)
We know, all your friends rushing out to buy new iPhones and you're stuck with that 'outdated' iPhone 5s you just bought. That's what happens when you go swimming without checking your pockets first. Still, it's not all bad: there's a Google for iOS...

Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

(18 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes On Thursday, a bipartisan law was introduced in the Senate that would limit US law enforcement's ability to obtain user data from US companies with servers physically located abroad. Law enforcement would still be able to gain access to those servers with a US warrant, but the warrant would be limited to data belonging to US citizens. This bill, called the LEADS Act (PDF), addresses concerns by the likes of Microsoft and other tech giants that worry about the impact law enforcement over-reach will have on their global businesses. Critics remain skeptical: "we are concerned about how the provision authorizing long-arm warrants for the accounts of US persons would be administered, and whether we could reasonably expect reciprocity from other nations on such an approach." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tweet-a-Program: tweet a Wolfram Language program to @WolframTaP, and a bot returns the result (Stephen Wolfram/Wolfram Blog)

(19 hours ago)
Stephen Wolfram / Wolfram Blog:Tweet-a-Program: tweet a Wolfram Language program to @WolframTaP, and a bot returns the result  —  Introducing Tweet-a-Program  —  In the Wolfram Language a little code can go a long way.  And to use that fact to let everyone have some fun, today we're introducing Tweet-a-Program.

KDE's UI To Bend Toward Simplicity

(19 hours ago)
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "KDE Software is often criticized for being too complicated for an average user to use. Try setting up Kmail and you would know what I mean. The KDE developers are aware of it and now they are working on making KDE UI simpler. KDE usability team lead Thomas Pfeiffer Thomas prefers a layered feature exposure so that users can enjoy certain advanced features at a later stage after they get accustomed to the basic functionality of the application. He quotes the earlier (pre-Plasma era) vision of KDE 4 – "Anything that makes Linux interesting for technical users (shells, compilation, drivers, minute user settings) will be available; not as the default way of doing things, but at the user's discretion." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Boeing To Take Space Tourists On Its CST-100 Spacecraft To the ISS

(20 hours ago)
MarkWhittington (1084047) writes "According to a Thursday story in Investment Business Daily, Boeing, whose CST-100 spacecraft was one of the two winners of NASA's commercial crew competition, will reserve one seat per flight for a paying tourist. For a price comparable to what space tourists now pay for trips on the Russian Soyuz, anyone will be able to take a jaunt to the International Space Station. The move places Boeing in direct competition with the Russians, who are working through a company called Space Adventures for their tourist space jaunts." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Sony brings Video Unlimited to Mac and PC browsers everywhere

(20 hours ago)
A lack of its own new PCs to use the service on isn't stopping Sony from bringing its Video Unlimited platform to the web. As the beleaguered electronics outfit notes on the PlayStation Blog of all places, it's playing catch-up king once again and no...

Evolution, a Silk Road successor tolerating identity theft, triples its listings in 5 months (Andy Greenberg/Wired)

(22 hours ago)
Andy Greenberg / Wired:Evolution, a Silk Road successor tolerating identity theft, triples its listings in 5 months  —  The Dark Web Gets Darker With Rise of the ‘Evolution’ Drug Market  —  In the digital drug trade as in the physical one, taking out one kingpin only makes room for another ready to satisfy the market's endless demand.

Android Apps Now Unofficially Able To Run On Any Major Desktop OS

(23 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes A developer who goes by the handle Vladikoff has tweaked Google's App Runtime for Chrome (ARC) to allow any Android app to run on any major desktop operating system, not just the handful announced last week which were also limited to Chrome OS. His tweaked version of ARC is re-packaged as ARChon. The install isn't very straightforward, and you have to be in developer mode on Chrome. But there's a support forum on reddit. The extension will work on any OS running the desktop version of Chrome 37 and up as long as the user also installs chromeos-apk, which converts raw Android app packages (APKs) to a Chrome extension. Ars Technica reports that apps run this way are buggy, fast, and crash often but expresses optimism for when Google officially "opens the floodgates on the Play Store, putting 1.3 million Android apps onto nearly every platform." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google's easing back on G+ sign-ups for new email accounts

(2 days ago)
Need to make a new Gmail account but don't want to deal with creating a mandatory Google+ profile to go with it? Don't sweat it, because Mountain View's removed that requirement to join its ailing social network, and once again signing up for the...

Expanded encryption in iOS and Android will spur legal battles over the privacy of passcodes (Kashmir Hill/Forbes)

(2 days ago)
Kashmir Hill / Forbes:Expanded encryption in iOS and Android will spur legal battles over the privacy of passcodes  —  Apple And Google Will Force A Legal Battle Over The Privacy Of Your Passcode  —  Apple wants the world to know that it's really, really serious about privacy.

With iOS 8, forensics tools can still obtain your camera reel, third-party app data, iTunes media, and more (Jonathan Zdziarski/Jonathan Zdziarski's ...)

(2 days ago)
Jonathan Zdziarski / Jonathan Zdziarski's Domain:With iOS 8, forensics tools can still obtain your camera reel, third-party app data, iTunes media, and more  —  Your iOS 8 Data is Not Beyond Law Enforcement's Reach... Yet.  —  In a recent announcement, Apple stated that they no longer unlock iOS (8) devices for law enforcement.

Data Archiving Standards Need To Be Future-Proofed

(2 days ago)
storagedude writes Imagine in the not-too-distant future, your entire genome is on archival storage and accessed by your doctors for critical medical decisions. You'd want that data to be safe from hackers and data corruption, wouldn't you? Oh, and it would need to be error-free and accessible for about a hundred years too. The problem is, we currently don't have the data integrity, security and format migration standards to ensure that, according to Henry Newman at Enterprise Storage Forum. Newman calls for standards groups to add new features like collision-proof hash to archive interfaces and software. 'It will not be long until your genome is tracked from birth to death. I am sure we do not want to have genome objects hacked or changed via silent corruption, yet this data will need to be kept maybe a hundred or more years through a huge number of technology changes. The big problem with archiving data today is not really the media, though that too is a problem. The big problem is the software that is needed and the standards that do not yet exist to manage and control long-term data,' writes Newman. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Creating a Google+ profile is no longer mandatory when signing up for Gmail (Larry Kim/WordStream)

(2 days ago)
Larry Kim / WordStream:Creating a Google+ profile is no longer mandatory when signing up for Gmail  —  Mandatory Google+ Gmail Integration Quietly Shelved  —  Google has gone to valiant lengths to convince us that rumors of Google+'s demise have been greatly exaggerated, but Google is no longer forcing new Gmail users …

Hearst Starts Silicon Valley Development Unit, Acquires BranchOut Assets (Mark Walsh/MediaPost)

(2 days ago)
Mark Walsh / MediaPost:Hearst Starts Silicon Valley Development Unit, Acquires BranchOut Assets  —  Hearst Corp. on Friday announced the launch of a new digital development unit in Silicon Valley to build new apps and services across the publisher's diversified media properties.  —  Leading the new group …

Ex-NBAer Rex Chapman allegedly stole from Apple Stores by faking EasyPay

(2 days ago)
Remember when Apple introduced its EasyPay self-checkout feature in 2011, and everyone wondered "how can they really tell if a customer is buying something or just shoplifting?" According to the Scottsdale, AZ police, former college and professional...

Verizon's VoLTE, enabling simultaneous voice/data and HD voice, now working on iPhone 6/6 Plus, LG G2, Samsung Galaxy S5 (Juli Clover/MacRumors)

(2 days ago)
Juli Clover / MacRumors:Verizon's VoLTE, enabling simultaneous voice/data and HD voice, now working on iPhone 6/6 Plus, LG G2, Samsung Galaxy S5  —  Simultaneous Voice/Data, HD Voice Now Available to Verizon iPhone 6 and 6 Plus Users  —  Verizon began rolling out its Advanced Calling service earlier this week …

Why a Chinese Company Is the Biggest IPO Ever In the US

(2 days ago)
An anonymous reader writes The Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has made headlines lately in US financial news. At the closing of its Initial Public Offering (IPO) on Friday, it had raised $21.8 billion on the New York Stock Exchange, larger even than Visa's ($17.9 billion), Facebook's ($16 billion), and General Motors ($15.8 billion) IPOs. Some critics do say that Alibaba's share price will plummet from its current value of $93.60 in the same way that Facebook's and Twitter's plummeted dramatically after initial offerings. Before we speculate, however, we should take note of what Alibaba is exactly. Beyond the likes of Amazon and eBay, Alibaba apparently links average consumers directly to manufacturers, which is handy for an economy ripe for change. Approximately half of Alibaba's shares "were sold to 25 investment firms", and "most of the shares went to US investors." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
Add a source
Share |
| 1 |2 |3 |4 |5 |6 |7 |8 |9 |10 |11 |12 |13 |14 |15 |16 |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |




T:0.286