Technology News

TalkTalk's unlimited everything SIM is £12 per month but laden with fine print

(43 minutes ago)
The UK mobile market is undergoing a serious makeover, with two huge acquisitions on the horizon and new MVNOs popping up left, right and centre. Quad-play provider TalkTalk is already known for its low-cost broadband, TV and mobile deals, but now's ...

Engineering Director Lars Rasmussen Leaving Facebook To Co-Found A Music Startup (Ingrid Lunden/TechCrunch)

(One hour ago)
Ingrid Lunden / TechCrunch:Engineering Director Lars Rasmussen Leaving Facebook To Co-Found A Music Startup  —  Facebook at Work, Facebook's first move to turn its social network into an enterprise tool, has remained in closed beta since its launch in January this year.  But as the product continues to inch …

Kojima and del Toro's 'Silent Hills' is not going to happen

(One hour ago)
Silent Hills, at least as it was originally conceived, is no more. The next chapter of the once-popular horror series had built considerable hype off the back of a fantastic playable teaser, P.T., which was released last summer. When solved the tease...

Governments can better mitigate risk from the burgeoning surveillance software industry with bug bounties, not export controls (Benjamin Brake/Foreign Affairs)

(One hour ago)
Benjamin Brake / Foreign Affairs:Governments can better mitigate risk from the burgeoning surveillance software industry with bug bounties, not export controls  —  The Bug Trade … Since Apple and Google announced last year that they would encrypt mobile user data by default, senior Western officials have denounced …

Facebook Tool Helps Track Nepal Quake Survivors

(2 hours ago)
Safety Check, which it rolled out last year, asks users in an area affected by disaster or tragedy if they are safe.

Ellen Pao faces $1m legal bill

(2 hours ago)
The woman who challenged sexism in Silicon Valley now faces a $1m legal bill unless she agrees not to appeal.

Cyber-thieves 'avoiding' bitcoins

(2 hours ago)
The falling value of bitcoins is making the virtual cash much less attractive to cyber-thieves, claims a security expert.

Political broadband map revealed

(2 hours ago)
Data which breaks down the UK's fastest broadband areas in terms of party politics has been revealed.

Microsoft quarterly profit falls

(2 hours ago)
Microsoft reports a 12% fall in profits to almost $5bn in the first three months of 2015, but sales rise to $21.7bn, cheering investors.

Google profits please investors

(2 hours ago)
US technology giant Google reports a 4% increase in profits in the first quarter to $3.59bn, helped by strong advertising sales.

Airport police to begin using drones

(2 hours ago)
Police guarding London airports will start using drones for surveillance following a review by counter-terrorism officers.

WhatsApp adds voice calls

(2 hours ago)
The app has added a new voice calling feature which allows people to ring other users for free.

VIDEO: The app that discovers edible weeds

(2 hours ago)
Scientists from the University of California, Berkeley are using crowdsourcing to locate edible weeds in urban areas.

VIDEO: Drone can stream live to You Tube

(2 hours ago)
DJI has launched a drone that has the ability to stream high-definition video live to You Tube.

VIDEO: 'The greatest feeling of freedom'

(2 hours ago)
Yves Rossy explains what it is like to fly with a jet pack.

VIDEO: The robot that makes coffee

(2 hours ago)
BBC Click's LJ Rich looks at some of the best of the week's technology news.

VIDEO: The end of the jumbo?

(2 hours ago)
With the order book for the most recent jumbo jets by Boeing and Airbus looking sparse, BBC News explains why the outlook for the jumbo is not looking good.

Does digital mean the end of history?

(2 hours ago)
Are we in danger of entering a digital dark age?

Bitcoin Island: the currency comes clean

(2 hours ago)
The small island that's going big on bitcoin

Linux 4.1 Bringing Many Changes, But No KDBUS

(2 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes: The first release candidate of Linux 4.1 has been released, Linus noted, "The merge window is pretty normal in terms of what got merged too. Just eyeballing the size, it looks like this is going to fit right in — while 4.0 was a bit smaller than usual, 4.1 seems to be smack dab in the middle of the normal range for the last couple of years." There are numerous new features in Linux 4.1 like Xbox One controller force feedback support, better Wacom tablet support, Intel Atom SoC performance improvements, Radeon DisplayPort MST support, EXT4 file-system encryption, ChromeOS Lightbar support, and ACPI for 64-bit ARM, among other additions. However, KDBUS wasn't accepted for Linux 4.1. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

VIDEO: Smart card is 'wallet replacement'

(2 hours ago)
The Stratos card aims to be a single credit-card sized replacement for all the existing cards in your wallet.

Car headlights of the future won't blind other drivers

(4 hours ago)
Carnegie Mellon's work on headlights has made an appearance here before, where it's near-future smart headlights would parse raindrops and 'cancel' them out, projecting light around the rain drops, substantially improving visibility. But that's just ...

The World of 3D Portraiture

(5 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes in with this BBC story about the niche market of 3D printed "selfie" models. By now we're familiar with tales of 3D-printed marvels, from guns to duck prosthetics. But when I traveled to a physics conference in March, I wasn't expecting to end up with a full colour printout of myself. However, at a small stall that popped up on Industry Day at the American Physical Society's March meeting — that is precisely the service that was being offered. I stepped on to a little rotating platform, tried to stand still for a few awkward minutes while a camera scanned me up and down, and then filled out a form. A few weeks later, a box has arrived in the post. Somewhere inside it, my two-inch twin is waiting for me to overcome my trepidation and show him the light of day. But I'm in no hurry; it all seems a bit... odd. The box sits on my desk for several days. Even though getting 'printed' puts me in the illustrious company of Barack Obama and Richard III, I'm unsure about my decision. What, I wonder, does someone do with a small selfie in statue form? Where does this business find its customers? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nepal communications hit by power outage, last-mile issues

(6 hours ago)
Phone and Internet communications have been hit in Nepal's capital city of Kathmandu after a devastating earthquake, forcing aid workers at times to ask people to go across with messages.

Behind Liberty Reserve, the digital currency shut down by US authorities for money laundering (Jake Halpern/The Atlantic)

(6 hours ago)
Jake Halpern / The Atlantic:Behind Liberty Reserve, the digital currency shut down by US authorities for money laundering  —  Bank of the Underworld … In the fall of 2011, the U.S. Secret Service orchestrated a sting operation.  The target was a Vietnamese man named Hieu Minh Ngo.

EBay supports Google over Brussels antitrust probe: FT

(6 hours ago)
(Reuters) - EBay Inc Chief Executive John Donahoe has supported arguments made by Google Inc in its defense in an antitrust case, saying the two companies are direct competitors in online shopping, the Financial Times reported.

Scientists spot runaway galaxies

(6 hours ago)
It's well established that runaway stars and planets are a cosmic reality, but runaway galaxies? Yes, amazingly enough, those exist. Scientists have discovered at least 11 galaxies moving so quickly (up to 6 million miles per hour) that they're escap...

Someone got Android Wear running on Samsung's Gear 2 watch

(8 hours ago)
Don't despair if you bought Samsung's Gear 2 smartwatch, only to realize that you wanted the Android-powered Gear Live instead -- there might be a solution in the works. XDA tinkerer biktor_gj has successfully loaded Android Wear on the Gear 2 after ...

Google Insiders Talk About Why Google+ Failed

(8 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes in with this story about what happened to Google+ from an employee perspective. "Last month, Google announced that it's changing up its strategy with Google+. In a sense, it's giving up on pitching Google+ as a social network aimed at competing with Facebook. Instead, Google+ will become two separate pieces: Photos and Streams. This didn't come as a surprise — Google+ never really caught on the same way social networks like Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn did....Rumors have been swirling for months that Google would change its direction with Google+. Business Insider spoke with a few insiders about what happened to the network that Google believed would change the way people share their lives online. Google+ was really important to Larry Page, too — one person said he was personally involved and wanted to get the whole company behind it. The main problem with Google+, one former Googler says, is the company tried to make it too much like Facebook. Another former Googler agrees, saying the company was 'late to market' and motivated from 'a competitive standpoint.'" Read more of this story at Slashdot.

In e-commerce push, Google releases first fashion trends report and plans to share search data to help major retailers with fashion planning and forecasting (Hiroko Tabuchi/New York Times)

(10 hours ago)
Hiroko Tabuchi / New York Times:In e-commerce push, Google releases first fashion trends report and plans to share search data to help major retailers with fashion planning and forecasting  —  The Latest Fashion, Trending on Google  —  Normcore?  So last year.  String bikinis?  Most definitely over.

Analysts expect record Apple Q2 results, estimate revenues up 23% YoY to $55.96B, iPhone sales up 33% to 58.1M units, and iPad down 17% to 13.6M units (Jay Yarow/Business Insider)

(11 hours ago)
Jay Yarow / Business Insider:Analysts expect record Apple Q2 results, estimate revenues up 23% YoY to $55.96B, iPhone sales up 33% to 58.1M units, and iPad down 17% to 13.6M units  —  All signs point to Apple announcing a monster earnings report  —  Apple reports earnings for the quarter that ended in March after the market closes on Monday, April 27.

When Exxon Wanted To Be a Personal Computing Revolutionary

(11 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes with this story about Exxon's early involvement with consumer computers. "This weekend is the anniversary of the release of the Apple IIc, the company's fourth personal computer iteration and its first attempt at creating a portable computer. In 1981, Apple's leading competitor in the world of consumer ('novice') computer users was IBM, but the market was about to experience a deluge of also-rans and other silent partners in PC history, including the multinational descendant of Standard Oil, Exxon. The oil giant had been quietly cultivating a position in the microprocessor industry since the mid-1970s via the rogue Intel engineer usually credited with developing the very first commercial microprocessor, Federico Faggin, and his startup Zilog. Faggin had ditched Intel in 1974, after developing the 4004 four-bit CPU and its eight-bit successor, the 8008. As recounted in Datapoint: The Lost Story of the Texans Who Invented the Personal Computer, Faggin was upset about Intel's new requirement that employees had to arrive by eight in the morning, while he usually worked nights. Soon after leaving Intel and forming Zilog, Faggin was approached by Exxon Enterprises, the investment arm of Exxon, which began funding Zilog in 1975." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Future Deconstruction of the K-12 Teacher

(12 hours ago)
An anonymous reader writes: English teacher Michael Godsey writes in The Atlantic what he envisions the role of teachers to be in the future. In a nutshell, he sees virtual classrooms, less pay, and a drastic decrease in the number of educators, but thinks they will all be "super-teachers". From the article: "Whenever a college student asks me, a veteran high-school English educator, about the prospects of becoming a public-school teacher, I never think it's enough to say that the role is shifting from 'content expert' to 'curriculum facilitator.' Instead, I describe what I think the public-school classroom will look like in 20 years, with a large, fantastic computer screen at the front, streaming one of the nation's most engaging, informative lessons available on a particular topic. The 'virtual class' will be introduced, guided, and curated by one of the country's best teachers (a.k.a. a "super-teacher"), and it will include professionally produced footage of current events, relevant excerpts from powerful TedTalks, interactive games students can play against other students nationwide, and a formal assessment that the computer will immediately score and record. I tell this college student that in each classroom, there will be a local teacher-facilitator (called a 'tech') to make sure that the equipment works and the students behave. Since the 'tech' won't require the extensive education and training of today's teachers, the teacher's union will fall apart, and that "tech"[..]

Jay Z says his Tidal music service is doing just fine, thank you

(12 hours ago)
Jay Z re-launched Tidal with a lot of fanfare, but how well is his artist-owned streaming service doing so far? Just fine, if you ask the man himself. As part of a flurry of Twitter posts, Mr. Carter revealed that Tidal has "over 770,000" subscribers...

Netflix moves from licensing its original shows to owning them, unlocking potential revenue from selling DVDs or licensing rights to other services (Lucas Shaw/Bloomberg Business)

(13 hours ago)
Lucas Shaw / Bloomberg Business:Netflix moves from licensing its original shows to owning them, unlocking potential revenue from selling DVDs or licensing rights to other services  —  Netflix's Pursuit of TV Domination Has a New Step: Ownership  —  For most of its rapid ascent of the TV business, Netflix Inc. has rented shows.
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