Technology News

Microsoft is Testing Ads in Mail App For Windows 10 in Select Markets

(30 minutes ago)
Mark Wilson writes: Ads in your inbox. Sounds like something you'd expect from the likes of Google or Yahoo, but Microsoft appears to be about to get in on the act as well. And we're not talking about online ads in your Outlook.com account -- we're talking about ads in the Mail app that's included with Windows 10. A new report says that Microsoft is currently testing ads with Windows Insiders, so it could be just a matter of time before they spread wider. In a support page, spotted first by news outlet Thurrott, Microsoft says, "Consistent with consumer email apps and services like Outlook.com, Gmail, and Yahoo Mail, advertising allows us to provide, support, and improve some of our products. We're always experimenting with new features and experiences. Currently, we have a pilot running in Brazil, Canada, Australia, and India to get user feedback on ads in Mail."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Cloud names Thomas Kurian to replace CEO Diane Greene

(30 minutes ago)
Former Oracle Corp product chief Thomas Kurian will replace Diane Greene as head of the cloud division at Alphabet Inc's Google in the coming weeks, Greene announced in a blog post on Friday, after a tumultuous year for the business.

Google Cloud names Thomas Kurian to replace CEO Diane Greene

(30 minutes ago)
Former Oracle Corp product chief Thomas Kurian will replace Diane Greene as head of the cloud division at Alphabet Inc's Google in the coming weeks, Greene announced in a blog post on Friday, after a tumultuous year for the business.

Russians impersonating U.S. State Department aide in hacking campaign: researchers

(One hour ago)
Hackers linked to the Russian government are impersonating U.S. State Department employees in an operation aimed at infecting computers of U.S. government agencies, think tanks and businesses, two cybersecurity firms told Reuters.

Google Maps Has Introduced So Many New Features and Design Changes in Recent Months That Getting Directions On It is Becoming an Increasingly Challenging Task

(One hour ago)
Earlier this week, Google announced it is bringing business messaging to Maps, the latest in a myriad of features it has introduced to its mapping platform in recent months. A business that wants to participate will need to use Google's "My Business" verification system and its associated app to send and receive messages. While that could prove useful to a number of businesses and customers, it has raised a concern as well. From a report: But that leads me to my third feeling: what the heck is going on with Google Maps? It is becoming overburdened with so many features and design changes that it's becoming harder and harder to just get directions in it. There's Group Planning, there's a social-esque "follow" button for local businesses, you can share your ETA, there's a redesigned "Explore" section, and there's almost no way to get the damn thing to show you a cross street near your destination without three full minutes of desperate pinching and zooming and re-zooming. It's becoming bloated, is what I'm saying. It's Google's equivalent of Big Blue, as Facebook nicknames its flagship app that does a thousand things across countless strange nooks and crannies. It's as though Google wants to kill off Yelp once and for all, but can't let anybody notice how hard it's trying to do that so it just slow rolls those things into Google Maps instead.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

U.S. regulator settles with tech startups over token sale violations

(One hour ago)
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Friday settled charges with two tech companies for improperly offering digital tokens, mandating that they register their offerings as securities and reimburse investors.

U.S. regulator settles with tech startups over token sale violations

(One hour ago)
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Friday settled charges with two tech companies for improperly offering digital tokens, mandating that they register their offerings as securities and reimburse investors.

Oracle veteran Thomas Kurian to replace Diane Greene as Google Cloud CEO

(One hour ago)
Former Oracle Corp product chief Thomas Kurian is replacing Diane Greene as chief executive of Alphabet Inc's Google Cloud, according to a blog post https://cloud.google.com/blog/topics/inside-google-cloud/transitioning-google-cloud-after-three-great-years from Greene.

Oracle veteran Thomas Kurian to replace Diane Greene as Google Cloud CEO

(One hour ago)
Former Oracle Corp product chief Thomas Kurian is replacing Diane Greene as chief executive of Alphabet Inc's Google Cloud, according to a blog post https://cloud.google.com/blog/topics/inside-google-cloud/transitioning-google-cloud-after-three-great-years from Greene.

A Leaky Database of SMS Text Messages Exposed Password Resets and Two-Factor Codes

(One hour ago)
A database which contained millions of text messages used to authenticate users signing into websites was left exposed to the internet without a password. From the report: The exposed server belongs to Voxox (formerly Telcentris), a San Diego, Calif.-based communications company. The server wasn't protected with a password, allowing anyone who knew where to look to peek in and snoop on a near-real-time stream of text messages. For Sebastien Kaul, a Berlin-based security researcher, it didn't take long to find. Although Kaul found the exposed server on Shodan, a search engine for publicly available devices and databases, it was also attached to to one of Voxox's own subdomains. Worse, the database -- running on Amazon's Elasticsearch -- was configured with a Kibana front-end, making the data within easily readable, browsable and searchable for names, cell numbers and the contents of the text messages themselves.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Store Starts Accepting Windows 10 on ARM Apps

(2 hours ago)
Microsoft announced Friday that it is opening up its online apps store to 64-bit ARM app submissions from developers, further cementing its commitment to make Windows 10 on ARM a viable platform. From a report: Also, with the release of Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9 this week, developers can now create ARM64 apps using officially supported SDK and tools. Microsoft announced Windows 10 on ARM in December 2017 with three big feature promises: The screen turns on "instantly," unlike existing PCs; LTE is built right in; and the battery can last for days. But the unveiling came with a big caveat. These Always Connected PCs, as Microsoft and Qualcomm call them, were not coming anytime soon. [...] Microsoft wants to help address the performance problems by getting developers to rebuild apps for the platform. Developers can now use Visual Studio 15.9 to recompile UWP and C++ Win32 apps to run natively on Windows 10 on ARM devices.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla starts taking Model 3 orders in China

(2 hours ago)
Tesla Inc has started taking orders for its Model 3 sedan in China for a deposit of 8,000 yuan ($1,153.60), according to the electric carmaker's China website https://www.tesla.cn/model3/reserve.

U.S. Senate bill vows to get tough on robocalls, up penalties

(3 hours ago)
Two U.S. senators on Friday unveiled bipartisan legislation to toughen penalties on robocalls, make it easier for regulators to crack down on unwanted calls and compel mobile phone providers to adopt call authentication technologies.

Science is Getting Less Bang for Its Buck

(3 hours ago)
Despite vast increases in the time and money spent on research, progress is barely keeping pace with the past. What went wrong? An anonymous reader shares a report: Today, there are more scientists, more funding for science, and more scientific papers published than ever before. On the surface, this is encouraging. But for all this increase in effort, are we getting a proportional increase in our scientific understanding? Or are we investing vastly more merely to sustain (or even see a decline in) the rate of scientific progress? It's surprisingly difficult to measure scientific progress in meaningful ways. Part of the trouble is that it's hard to accurately evaluate how important any given scientific discovery is. [...] With that in mind, we ran a survey asking scientists to compare Nobel prizewinning discoveries in their fields. We then used those rankings to determine how scientists think the quality of Nobel prizewinning discoveries has changed over the decades. As a sample survey question, we might ask a physicist which was a more important contribution to scientific understanding: the discovery of the neutron (the particle that makes up roughly half the ordinary matter in the universe) or the discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation (the afterglow of the Big Bang). Think of the survey as a round-robin tournament, competitively matching discoveries against one another, with expert scientists judging which is better. For the physics prize, we surveyed 93[..]

Kilogram Gets a New Definition

(3 hours ago)
Scientists have changed the way the kilogram is defined. Currently, it is defined by the weight of a platinum-based ingot called "Le Grand K" which is locked away in a safe in Paris. On Friday, researchers meeting in Versailles voted to get rid of it in favour of defining a kilogram in terms of an electric current. From a report: The decision was made at the General Conference on Weights and Measures. But some scientists, such as Perdi Williams at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK, have expressed mixed feelings about the change. "I haven't been on this project for too long but I feel a weird attachment to the kilogram," she said. "I think it is such an exciting thing and this is a really big moment. So I'm a little bit sad about [the change]. But it is an important step forward and so the new system is going to work a lot better. It is also a really exciting time, and I can't wait for it to happen." Le Grand K has been at the forefront of the international system of measuring weights since 1889. Several close replicas were made and distributed around the globe. But the master kilogram and its copies were seen to change -- ever so slightly -- as they deteriorated. In a world where accurate measurement is now critical in many areas, such as in drug development, nanotechnology and precision engineering -- those responsible for maintaining the international system had no option but to move beyond Le Grand K to a more robust definition.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The egos disbanded? Bridging the great advertising divide

(4 hours ago)
Traditional advertising groups hope that their creative flair will prevail against the technological clout of consultancies encroaching on their business, but there are signs the two sides of the divide are moving closer together.

PlayStation Begins Collecting Amusement Tax From Chicago Users

(4 hours ago)
schwit1 writes: PlayStation users in Chicago on Wednesday began paying a 9 percent tax on streaming content as the gaming company starts complying with a city levy. The Sony-owned company joins other streaming services including Spotify, Netflix and Hulu in complying with the charge, which took effect three years ago. The city's amusement tax, which used to apply mostly to concert and sporting event tickets, was extended to include streaming services in 2015. That includes charges paid for playing games, according to Chicago's Finance Department. Some tech companies have fought the additional 9 percent charge. Apple filed a lawsuit against the city in August alleging the tax on its music streaming services was illegal and discriminatory. That suit is pending in Cook County Circuit Court. Meanwhile, Apple is not collecting the tax. In 2015, a group of Netflix, Amazon Prime, Spotify, XBox Live and Hulu users sued Chicago in Cook County, alleging the tax violates federal law. The judge ruled in the city's favor in May, and the streaming service users appealed the decision. The case is pending in state Appellate Court.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

European chipmakers see new growth drivers to weather volatile demand

(5 hours ago)
European chipmakers tried to play down market concerns about a potential slowdown in global demand at an investor conference in Barcelona this week, striking an upbeat tone on orders from car and smartphone makers.

VW embarks on $50 billion electrification plan

(5 hours ago)
Volkswagen plans to spend 44 billion euros ($50 billion) on electric cars, autonomous driving and new mobility services by 2023 and explore closer cooperation with Ford, the German company said on Friday.

Jeff Bezos To Employees: 'One Day, Amazon Will Fail' But Our Job is To Delay it as Long as Possible

(5 hours ago)
Days before Amazon announced the cities it had picked for its HQ2, CEO Jeff Bezos had to address a separate but related concern among employees: Where is all this headed? At an all-hands meeting last Thursday in Seattle, an employee asked Bezos about Amazon's future. Specifically, the questioner wanted to know what lessons Bezos has learned from the recent bankruptcies of Sears and other big retailers. From a report: "Amazon is not too big to fail," Bezos said, in a recording of the meeting that CNBC has heard. "In fact, I predict one day Amazon will fail. Amazon will go bankrupt. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be 30-plus years, not a hundred-plus years." The key to prolonging that demise, Bezos continued, is for the company to "obsess over customers" and to avoid looking inward, worrying about itself. "If we start to focus on ourselves, instead of focusing on our customers, that will be the beginning of the end," he said. "We have to try and delay that day for as long as possible." Bezos' comments come at a time of unprecedented success at Amazon, with its core retail business continuing to grow while the company is winning the massive cloud-computing market and gaining rapid adoption of its Alexa voice assistant in the home.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Viacom signs multi-picture film deal with Netflix

(5 hours ago)
Viacom Inc's Paramount Pictures Chief Executive Officer Jim Gianopulos said on Friday it has signed a multi-picture film deal with Netflix Inc.

'The Internet Needs More Friction'

(5 hours ago)
Justin Kosslyn, who leads product management at Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet that builds technology to address global security challenges, writes: The Internet's lack of friction made it great, but now our devotion to minimizing friction is perhaps the internet's weakest link for security. Friction -- delays and hurdles to speed and growth -- can be a win-win-win for users, companies, and security. It is time to abandon our groupthink bias against friction as a design principle. Highways have speed limits and drugs require prescriptions -- rules that limit how fast you can drive a vehicle or access a controlled substance -- yet digital information moves limitlessly. The same design philosophy that accelerated the flow of correspondence, news, and commerce also accelerates the flow of phishing, ransomware, and disinformation. In the old days, it took time and work to steal secrets, blackmail people, and meddle across borders. Then came the internet. From the beginning, it was designed as a frictionless communication platform across countries, companies, and computers. Reducing friction is generally considered a good thing: it saves time and effort, and in many genuine ways makes our world smaller. There are also often financial incentives: more engagement, more ads, more dollars. But the internet's lack of friction has been a boon to the dark side, too. Now, in a matter of hours a "bad actor" can steal corporate secrets or use ransomware to blackmail thousands of people.[..]

Europe 5G network buildout to trigger deals, won't bust capex budgets

(6 hours ago)
The launch of fifth-generation mobile services across Europe looks set to trigger a wave of infrastructure deals as telecoms companies seek ways to upgrade their networks without busting their strained capital budgets.

Europe 5G network buildout to trigger deals, won't bust capex budgets

(6 hours ago)
The launch of fifth-generation mobile services across Europe looks set to trigger a wave of infrastructure deals as telecoms companies seek ways to upgrade their networks without busting their strained capital budgets.

VW says could build up to 15 million electric cars

(6 hours ago)
Volkswagen could build up to 15 million electric cars over several years on its new electric vehicle production platform, the company said on Friday, adding that its Chief Executive Herbert Diess had misspoken in an interview on Monday.

Volkswagen to spend 44 billion euros on electric, autonomous cars by 2023

(6 hours ago)
Volkswagen on Friday said it will spend 44 billion euros on electric cars, digitalization, autonomous driving and new mobility services by 2023 as part of a push by Europe's largest carmaker to mass produce electric cars.

Supply glut mars Turing effect for Nvidia shares

(6 hours ago)
Worries about how fast the computing world will transition to Nvidia Corp's next generation "Turing" graphic chips helped knock 20 percent off the value of its shares on Friday, after results pointed to a huge glut of unsold older generation chips.

FCC Paves the Way For Improved GPS Accuracy

(6 hours ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) paved the way for improved GPS and location accuracy today, approving an order that will allow U.S. phones to access a European satellite system. The order allows non-federal consumer devices to access the European Union's version of GPS, which is also known as Galileo. The system is available globally, and it officially went live in 2016. By opening up access, devices that can retrieve a signal from both Galileo and the U.S. GPS system will see improved timing estimates and location reliability. The iPhone 8 was the first Apple product to support it. Other phone models from Huawei and Samsung support the system, too. "Since the debut of the first consumer handheld GPS device in 1989, consumers and industry in the United States have relied on the U.S. GPS to support satellite-based positioning, navigation, and timing services that are integral to everyday applications ranging from driving directions to precision farming," the FCC said in a release. Now, the U.S. system will be able to commingle with the European one, making the way for better reliability, range, and accuracy.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Russia stifled mobile network during protests: document

(7 hours ago)
Russian authorities ordered two mobile operators to cut most access to mobile data services in the region of Ingushetia as protesters were massing outside government offices there, according to a document from the state telecoms regulator.

Award for wartime flight trainer returned to service

(8 hours ago)
Tens of thousands of pilots trained in a tiny, mechanical flight simulator which has been restored.

EU executive poised to propose tariffs on Chinese e-bikes

(8 hours ago)
The European Commission is set to propose final duties to curb cheap imports of Chinese electric bicycles that European producers say are benefiting from unfair subsidies and flooding the European Union market.

BlackBerry to buy cybersecurity firm Cylance for $1.4 billion

(9 hours ago)
BlackBerry Ltd said on Friday it will acquire Cylance, an artificial intelligence and cybersecurity company, for $1.4 billion in cash to help expand its QNX unit that makes software for next-generation autonomous cars.

Remote Workers Can Get a Cushy Apartment, Free Office Space, and $10K If They Move To Tulsa

(9 hours ago)
Tulsa, Oklahoma is offering full-time remote workers in the U.S. free office space, a subsidized furnished apartment, and $10,000 cash if you move there and stay for at least one year. The city wants to attract so-called "digital nomads," who would, presumably, start paying taxes, launch businesses, and otherwise contribute to the economy of wherever they're drawn to. Nextgov reports: Tulsa Remote is one of several revitalization projects in the region funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation. The Tulsa-based philanthropic organization was started by George B. Kaiser, an oil and banking billionaire who has signed on to Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates' "Giving Pledge," whose wealthy signees promise to give away at least half their fortunes to charity. The organization has budgeted for 20 new remote workers in the program's first year, says Ken Levit, GKFF's executive director. Applicants must be at least 18, eligible to work in the U.S., already working full-time for an employer based outside the boundaries of Tulsa County, and prepared to move to Tulsa within six months. Applications opened Tuesday at the website TulsaRemote.com; the city hopes to settle the first new residents within the next three months, Levit said.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

India's Flipkart Group fashion unit chief denies he is quitting

(9 hours ago)
The chief of Flipkart Group's Myntra-Jabong fashion business on Friday denied a media report that he will quit after a reshuffle in the ranks following the ouster of group CEO Binny Bansal.

EE and Virgin Media fined £13.3m for overcharging customers

(11 hours ago)
The companies overcharged phone and broadband customers leaving their contracts early, Ofcom says.

'How Amazon helped me transition to a woman'

(11 hours ago)
Sophie Roberts is a software developer at the tech giant who came out at work in October.

Google Is Closing Its Schaft Robotics Unit

(12 hours ago)
Google's parent company Alphabet is closing down Schaft, its secretive unit that develops bipedal robots aimed at helping out in disaster efforts. The news was first reported by Nikkei, but Alphabet confirmed to TechCrunch that the business will be shuttered. It said it is helping staff find new roles, most of which will likely be outside of Google and its Alphabet parent. TechCrunch reports: The company was scheduled to be sold to SoftBank alongside Boston Dynamics -- another of Alphabet's robotics ventures -- through a deal that was announced last year. Boston Dynamics made the transition but Schaft didn't. Softbank never shouted that omission from the rooftops, but a source with knowledge of the deal told us that certain conditions agreed for the deal were not fulfilled, hence Schaft remained with Alphabet. Our source explained that Alphabet's robotics focused shifted away from Schaft and instead to non-humanoid robots and industry-led solutions such as robotic arms. The departure of Andy Rubin, the controversial robotics evangelist who reportedly got a $90 million payout to leave amid sexual misconduct allegations, seemed to speed up its demise inside the organization. Alphabet shopped the Schaft business fairly widely -- since 2016 and after the SoftBank deal collapsed -- but to no avail, we understand. That left closing it down as the last remaining option.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Thai proposal for all-powerful cyber agency alarms businesses, activists

(13 hours ago)
A proposed cybersecurity law in Thailand would give a new government agency sweeping powers to spy on internet traffic, order the removal of content, or even seize computers without judicial oversight, alarming businesses and activists.

Inventors of Omnidirectional Wind Turbine Win James Dyson Award

(16 hours ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: A spinning turbine that can capture wind traveling in any direction and could transform how consumers generate electricity in cities has won its inventors a prestigious international award and ~$38,000 prize. Nicolas Orellana, 36, and Yaseen Noorani, 24, MSc students at Lancaster University, scooped the James Dyson award for their O-Wind Turbine, which -- in a technological first -- takes advantage of both horizontal and vertical winds without requiring steering. O-Wind Turbine is a 25cm sphere with geometric vents that sits on a fixed axis and spins when wind hits it from any direction. When wind energy turns the device, gears drive a generator that converts the power of the wind into electricity. The students believe the device, which could take at least five years to be put into commercial production, could be installed on large structures such as the side of a building or balcony, where wind speeds are highest. Dyson, who chose the winners, hailed it as "an ingenious concept." He continued: "Designing something that solves a problem is an intentionally broad brief. It invites talented, young inventors to do more than just identify real problems. It empowers them to use their ingenuity to develop inventive solutions. O-Wind Turbine does exactly that. It takes the enormous challenge of producing renewable energy and using geometry it can harness energy in places where we've scarcely been looking -- cities."Read more of[..]

Why Sleep Apnea Patients Rely On a Lone, DRM-Breaking CPAP Machine Hacker

(17 hours ago)
Jason Koebler writes: "SleepyHead" is a free, open-source, and definitely not FDA-approved piece of software for sleep apnea patients that is the product of thousands of hours of hacking and development by a lone Australian developer named Mark Watkins, who has helped thousands of sleep apnea patients take back control of their treatment from overburdened and underinvested doctors. The software gives patients access to the sleep data that is already being generated by their CPAP machines but generally remains inaccessible, hidden by DRM and proprietary data formats that can only be read by authorized users (doctors) on proprietary pieces of software that patients often can't buy or download. SleepyHead and community-run forums like CPAPtalk.com and ApneaBoard.com have allowed patients to circumvent medical device manufacturers, who would prefer that the software not exist at all. Medical device manufacturers fought in 2015 to prevent an exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to legalize hacking by patients who wanted to access their own data, but an exemption was granted, legalizing SleepyHead and software like it.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Justice Department Is Preparing To Prosecute WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

(18 hours ago)
According to the Wall Street Journal, "the Justice Department is preparing to prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source) and is increasingly optimistic it will be able to get him into a U.S. courtroom." From the report: Over the past year, U.S. prosecutors have discussed several types of charges they could potentially bring against Mr. Assange, the people said. Mr. Assange has lived in the Ecuadorean embassy in London since receiving political asylum from the South American country in 2012. The people familiar with the case wouldn't describe whether discussions were under way with the U.K. or Ecuador about Mr. Assange, but said they were encouraged by recent developments. Prosecutors have considered publicly indicting Mr. Assange to try to trigger his removal from the embassy, the people said, because a detailed explanation of the evidence against Mr. Assange could give Ecuadorean authorities a reason to turn him over. The exact charges Justice Department might pursue remain unclear, but they may involve the Espionage Act, which criminalizes the disclosure of national defense-related information.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Crypto hangover' hammers Nvidia's outlook, shares drop 17 percent

(18 hours ago)
Chip designer Nvidia Corp on Thursday forecast disappointing sales for the holiday quarter, pinning the blame on unsold chips piling up with distributors and retailers after the evaporation of the cryptocurrency mining boom.

Facebook defends Russia response, updates plan to curb misbehavior

(18 hours ago)
Facebook Inc Chairman and Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday defended his response to Russian election meddling on the world's largest social media network and issued a new plan aimed at stifling misbehavior while maintaining a vibrant hub for online speech.

Facebook defends Russia response, updates plan to curb misbehavior

(18 hours ago)
Facebook Inc Chairman and Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday defended his response to Russian election meddling on the world's largest social media network and issued a new plan aimed at stifling misbehavior while maintaining a vibrant hub for online speech.

Facebook Claims NYT Expose Has 'A Number of Inaccuracies'

(19 hours ago)
Earlier today, Facebook issued a response to a New York Times report on the social media company's handling of the many scandals it faced last year, including Russian interference and the Cambridge Analytica scandal. "There are a number of inaccuracies in the story," Facebook said in a point-by-point blog post, including that the company was aware of Russian meddling on the social platform months before taking any action. Variety reports: Facebook said it has "acknowledged publicly on many occasions" that "we were too slow to spot Russian interference on Facebook, as well as other misuse." But Facebook denied the allegation in the Times report that the company knew about Russian activity as early as the spring of 2016 and had failed to actively investigate it. The company cited CEO Mark Zuckerberg's congressional testimony from April 2018, in which he said Facebook detected threats related to Russia only in the weeks leading up to the U.S. election in November 2016. When it identified fake accounts that were used to furnish stolen information to journalists, "we shut these accounts down for violating our policies," Zuckerberg testified. Meanwhile, Facebook in October 2017 enlisted Washington, D.C.-area PR firm Definers Public Affairs, founded by Republican political strategists, as part of its crisis response to dealing with the Russia fallout. Among other activities, Definers launched a campaign linking Facebook critics to liberal billionaire George Soros, a common tactic[..]

Ecuador OKs extraditing self-proclaimed Facebook owner to U.S.: lawyer

(19 hours ago)
An Ecuadorean court authorized the extradition of Paul Ceglia, a New Yorker charged with trying to defraud Facebook Inc founder Mark Zuckerberg, to the United States, Ceglia's lawyer in the Andean country said on Thursday.
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