Technology News

Venezuela unveils virtual currency amid economic crisis

(2 days ago)
President Maduro says the Petro crypto-currency will be backed by the country's oil and gas wealth.

Barclays axes free Kaspersky product as a 'precaution'

(2 days ago)
The bank emailed 290,000 customers on Saturday following warnings about Russian security software.

'Snoopers' charter' changes put forward

(2 days ago)
The government says it accepts the Investigatory Powers Act is "inconsistent with EU law".

The children whose gaming turns to gambling

(2 days ago)
Skin betting websites let players gamble with virtual items from online games as currency.

UK inventors claim funding rules hold them back

(2 days ago)
Garden shed inventors talk about the challenges they face to get government funding for their ideas.

Paddington 2: The challenges of making the film

(2 days ago)
An exclusive look at the visual effects behind the film Paddington 2.

Virtual reality used to help adoptive parents

(2 days ago)
Experiencing a child's traumatic past could help parents understand their behaviour.

The woman making money from food porn

(2 days ago)
Meet Kimberly Espinel - the blogger teaching people how to photograph food for Instagram.

Priyanka Chopra sparks Twitter search for most unread emails

(2 days ago)
A photo of Bollywood star's 250,000-plus unread emails sparks a search for the most bloated inbox online.

OnePlus: Inside its smartphone factory

(2 days ago)
Click gets exclusive access to a factory in Shenzhen to see how the new OnePlus 5T phone is made.

Simulator trains teachers to deal with mass shootings

(2 days ago)
In the last four years there have been more than 200 school shootings in the United States.

Baidu's voice-controlled smart speaker and other news

(2 days ago)
BBC Click's Nick Kwek looks at some of the best of the week's technology news stories.

CAST studies how robots could work better with people

(2 days ago)
A new research lab is looking to find the best ways to train robots to work with people.

Hola mundo

(2 days ago)
Babbel, one of the world's most popular language learning websites, was set up by friends after one of them wanted to learn Spanish.

Dangerous milk

(2 days ago)
The tech tackling fake baby formula, dodgy drugs, conflict diamonds and fishy fish.

Google Pixel Buds language translation tested

(2 days ago)
Rory puts Google's language translating headphones through their paces, with varying results.

Ask Slashdot: What Is Your View On UFO Sightings?

(2 days ago)
dryriver writes: UFOs sightings have been reported in the tens of thousands over the last decades. In the past, some have seen flying cigar-shaped craft (blimps?), some flying triangles, some more rounded-looking flying saucers. Often the apparent spacecraft does something improbable like standing completely still in the sky and then shooting off to somewhere at an incredible speed. Some sightings are just lights or light formations flying around or dancing around in the night sky -- which could be military aircraft like helicopters and F16s training at night. There seem to be people who genuinely see stuff that is hard to explain, people who fake UFO sightings, photos and videos for profit to keep the "UFO industry" of websites, radio shows and magazines afloat, and yet others that think a regular airplane flying at night with its lights on is a UFO. What is your view on all this? Are we being visited from outer space? Is it prototype aircraft that look like UFOs to the untrained eye? Was some 190 IQ inventor-prankster having fun with quadcopter drones with colored lights four decades before quadcopters became a thing (hey, tons of people have created fake crop-circles in the past)? Where do all these supposed UFO sightings and reports come from? Did events like the famous "Battle Of Los Angeles" actually happen? And do you find any UFO reports credible at all?Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How algorithms helped design a concert hall

(2 days ago)
Each of the 10,000 acoustic panels is unique and designed to give the best listening experience.

Synthetic DNA-Based Drug Is First To Slow Progress of Huntington's Disease

(2 days ago)
John.Banister writes: The Guardian reports of early success in the trial of a synthetic DNA based drug, Ionis-HTTRx, at University College London's Huntington's Disease Center. Bionews explains that this gene silencing drug binds to the RNA transcript of the faulty huntingtin gene, triggering its destruction before it can go on to make the huntingtin protein. There's much excited speculation that the same technique could be used for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, once people know which genes to target. "The trial involved 46 men and women with early stage Huntington's disease in the UK, Germany and Canada," reports The Guardian. "The patients were given four spinal injections one month apart and the drug dose was increased at each session; roughly a quarter of participants had a placebo injection. After being given the drug, the concentration of harmful protein in the spinal cord fluid dropped significantly and in proportion with the strength of the dose. This kind of closely matched relationship normally indicates a drug is having a powerful effect."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bitcoin Fees Are Skyrocketing

(2 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The cost to complete a Bitcoin transaction has skyrocketed in recent days. A week ago, it cost around $6 on average to get a transaction accepted by the Bitcoin network. The average fee soared to $26 on Friday and was still almost $20 on Sunday. The reason is simple: until recently, the Bitcoin network had a hard-coded 1 megabyte limit on the size of blocks on the blockchain, Bitcoin's shared transaction ledger. With a typical transaction size of around 500 bytes, the average block had fewer than 2,000 transactions. And with a block being generated once every 10 minutes, that works out to around 3.3 transactions per second. A September upgrade called segregated witness allowed the cryptographic signatures associated with each transaction to be stored separately from the rest of the transaction. Under this scheme, the signatures no longer counted against the 1 megabyte blocksize limit, which should have roughly doubled the network's capacity. But only a small minority of transactions have taken advantage of this option so far, so the network's average throughput has stayed below 2,500 transactions per block -- around four transactions per second.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: Biggest IT Management Mistakes?

(2 days ago)
snydeq writes: Sure, nobody's perfect. But for those in charge of enterprise technology, the fallout from a strategic gaffe, bad hire, or weak spine can be disastrous, writes Dan Tynan, in an article on the biggest management mistakes in IT. "Some of the most common IT gaffes include becoming trapped in a relationship with a vendor you can't shake loose, hiring or promoting the wrong people, and hiding problems from top management until it's too late to recover." What are some other career- and company-destroyers you've witnessed in your years in IT?Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Atos offers to buy Gemalto for 4.3 billion euros to boost cyber security services

(2 days ago)
PARIS (Reuters) - French technology consulting firm Atos offered to buy Gemalto for 4.3 billion euros ($5.06 billion) on Monday to boost its cyber security services as states and big corporations seek to cope with a growing number of attacks on the Internet worldwide.

SEC halts virtual coin offering, issues investor warning

(2 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Monday warned investors of the dangers of putting their money into cryptocurrencies, saying trading and public offerings in the emerging asset class may be in violation of federal securities law.

Uber fights ban on cash payments in Mexican state

(2 days ago)
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Uber Technologies Inc said on Monday that it had appealed regulations that have barred it from accepting cash fares in the Mexican state of Puebla, in a new challenge to clampdowns on the ride-hailing service in Latin America.

Microsoft Releases Free Preview of Its Quantum Development Kit

(2 days ago)
Microsoft is releasing a free preview version of its Quantum Development Kit. "The kit includes the Q# programming language and compiler and a local quantum computing simulator, and is fully integrated with Visual Studio," reports ZDNet. "There's also an Azure-based simulator that allows developers to simulate more than 40 logical qubits of computing power, plus documentation libraries, and sample programs, officials said in their December 11 announcement." From the report: Quantum computers are designed to process in parallel, thus enabling new types of applications across a variety of workloads. They are designed to harness the physics of subatomic particles to provide a different way to store data and solve problems compared to conventional computers, as my ZDNet colleague Tony Baer explains. The result is that quantum computers could solve certain high-performance-computing problems more efficiently. Microsoft officials have said applications that developers create for use with the quantum simulator ultimately will work on a quantum computer, which Microsoft is in the process of developing. Microsoft's goal is to build out a full quantum computing system, including both the quantum computing hardware and the related full software stack.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

FCC Explains How Net Neutrality Will Be Protected Without Net Neutrality Rules

(2 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Federal Communications Commission is still on track to eliminate net neutrality rules this Thursday, but the commission said today that it has a new plan to protect consumers after the repeal. The FCC and Federal Trade Commission released a draft memorandum of understanding (MOU) describing how the agencies will work together to make sure ISPs keep their net neutrality promises. After the repeal, there won't be any rules preventing ISPs from blocking or throttling Internet traffic. ISPs will also be allowed to charge websites and online services for faster and more reliable network access. In short, ISPs will be free to do whatever they want -- unless they make specific promises to avoid engaging in specific types of anti-competitive or anti-consumer behavior. When companies make promises and break them, the FTC can punish them for deceiving consumers. That's what FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and Acting FTC Chair Maureen Ohlhausen are counting on. "Instead of saddling the Internet with heavy-handed regulations, we will work together to take targeted action against bad actors," Pai said in a joint announcement with the FTC today.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

In-Store WiFi Provider Used Starbucks Website To Generate Monero Coins

(2 days ago)
hjf writes: On December 2nd, Twitter user Noah Dinkin tweeted a screenshot that showed that Starbucks' in-store "free WiFi" is using their captive portal to briefly mine the Monero cryptocurrency during the 10-second delay splash screen. Starbucks has not yet responded to the tweet, and neither has their wifi provider, Fibertel Argentina. While Dinkin mentioned that the culprit behind the scheme could be Starbucks' in-store wifi provider, it's possible that a cybercriminal could have hacked their website to place CoinHive code secretly. HackRead notes that "just a few days ago researchers identified more than 5,000 sites that were hijacked to insert CoinHive code, yet Starbucks' direct involvement is still unclear." CoinHive is a company that produces a JavaScript miner for the Monero Blockchain that you can embed in your website. Any coins mined by the browser are sent to the owner of the website.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

AI-Assisted Fake Porn Is Here and We're All Screwed

(2 days ago)
New submitter samleecole shares a report from Motherboard: There's a video of Gal Gadot having sex with her stepbrother on the internet. But it's not really Gadot's body, and it's barely her own face. It's an approximation, face-swapped to look like she's performing in an existing incest-themed porn video. The video was created with a machine learning algorithm, using easily accessible materials and open-source code that anyone with a working knowledge of deep learning algorithms could put together. It's not going to fool anyone who looks closely. Sometimes the face doesn't track correctly and there's an uncanny valley effect at play, but at a glance it seems believable. It's especially striking considering that it's allegedly the work of one person -- a Redditor who goes by the name 'deepfakes' -- not a big special effects studio that can digitally recreate a young Princess Leia in Rouge One using CGI. Instead, deepfakes uses open-source machine learning tools like TensorFlow, which Google makes freely available to researchers, graduate students, and anyone with an interest in machine learning. Anyone could do it, and that should make everyone nervous.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cutting U.S. electric vehicle tax credit 'will have an impact': GM

(2 days ago)
DETROIT (Reuters) - If Congress eliminates an electric vehicle tax credit it "will have an impact" on sales of U.S. electric vehicles such as General Motors Co's Chevrolet Bolt, GM Chief Executive Mary Barra said on Monday.

Apple Buys Shazam To Boost Apple Music

(2 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Apple agreed to acquire music-identification service Shazam, taking ownership of one of the first apps to demonstrate the power of the iPhone, recognizing songs after hearing just a few bars of a tune. Terms of the deal weren't disclosed, but a person familiar with the situation said Apple is paying about $400 million for the U.K.-based startup. That would be one of Apple's largest acquisitions ever, approaching the size of its 1996 purchase of Next Computer Inc. which brought co-founder Steve Jobs back to the company. That transaction would be worth more than $600 million in today's dollars. The Shazam app uses the microphone on a smartphone or computer to identify almost any song playing nearby, then points users to places they can listen to it in future, such as Apple Music or Google's YouTube. "Apple Music and Shazam are a natural fit, sharing a passion for music discovery and delivering great music experiences to our users," Apple said in an emailed statement on Monday. "We have exciting plans in store, and we look forward to combining with Shazam upon approval of today's agreement. Since the launch of the App Store, Shazam has consistently ranked as one of the most popular apps for iOS," Apple also said. "Today, it's used by hundreds of millions of people around the world, across multiple platforms." The acquisition would help Apple embed that capability more deeply into its music offerings. The company's digital[..]

SEC halts initial coin offering from restaurant review app

(2 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has stepped in to stop an "initial coin offering" (ICO) from a restaurant review app, after the company failed to register it as a security.

U.S. agency prepares to hand over internet oversight to FTC

(2 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission plans to turn over oversight of internet service providers to another federal agency as it plans to vote on Thursday to revoke the landmark 2015 "net neutrality" rules.

U.S. agency prepares to hand over internet oversight to FTC

(2 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission plans to turn over oversight of internet service providers to another federal agency as it plans to vote on Thursday to revoke the landmark 2015 "net neutrality" rules.
Add a source
Share |
| 1 |2 |3 |4 |5 |6 |7 |8 |




T:0.1797