Technology News

British Airways reports computer problems affecting check-in

(3 days ago)
British Airways said on Twitter on Wednesday it is experiencing some "system issues" and "online check-in is down" as some passengers reported that planes operated by the company were not taking off from London's Heathrow Airport.

Apple iCloud Data in China is Being Stored By a State-Run Telco

(3 days ago)
Six months ago Apple caused controversy by announcing its intentions to move Chinese users' iCloud keys out of the US and into China, in order to comply with Chinese law. From a report: Now, that data, which includes emails, text messages and pictures, is being looked after by government-owned mobile operator China Telecom. And users and human rights activists alike have big concerns. The move has unsurprisingly been praised by state media, with Chinese consumers being told they can now expect faster speeds and greater connectivity. But as comments on Weibo (China's equivalent of Twitter) reveal, users have major privacy worries, claiming the government -- known for its extreme citizen surveillance methods -- will now be able to check personal data whenever it wishes.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

U.S. tech enforcer says will read 'closely' EU statement on Google

(3 days ago)
The head of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which has investigated Alphabet's Google in the past for abuse of web dominance, said on Wednesday he would take a close look at Europe's recent decision to fine the company 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion).

Hyundai sets up showroom on Amazon

(3 days ago)
Hyundai Motor Co said on Wednesday it will set up a showroom on Amazon.com that will help car buyers book test drives, check dealer inventories and compare pricing and reviews.

U.S. tech enforcer says will read 'closely' EU statement on Google

(3 days ago)
The head of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which has investigated Alphabet's Google in the past for abuse of web dominance, said on Wednesday he would take a close look at Europe's recent decision to fine the company 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion).

Hyundai sets up showroom on Amazon

(3 days ago)
Hyundai Motor Co said on Wednesday it will set up a showroom on Amazon.com that will help car buyers book test drives, check dealer inventories and compare pricing and reviews.

Blue Origin Pushed Its Rocket 'To Its Limits' With High-Altitude Emergency Abort Test

(3 days ago)
Blue Origin pulled off another successful test launch today, landing both the New Shepard rocket -- a reusable vehicle designed to take tourists to the edge of space and back -- and capsule after flight. From a report: The company ignited the capsule's emergency motor after it had separated from the rocket, pushing the spacecraft up to a top altitude of around 74 miles -- a new record for Blue Origin. The firing also caused the capsule to sustain up to 10 Gs during the test, but Blue Origin host Ariane Cornell said "that is well within what humans can take, especially for such a short spurt of time." [...] The rocket which went up today is the third New Shepard vehicle that the company has ever flown. The first one flew to a super high altitude in April 2015, but the booster was unable to land back on Earth after flight. The second iteration of the vehicle was much more successful, however. Blue Origin launched and landed the rocket and booster a total of five times before retiring the system. This third New Shepard has already done two launches and landings, and it sports some upgrades over its predecessors. For instance, this one actually has windows in the crew capsule; the second vehicle had its windows painted on. Blue Origin is building even more vehicles to carry passengers, though there isn't a firm date for when the first crewed flights will occur. The company's president Rob Meyerson has estimated that the first test passengers could fly as soon as this year, while[..]

How 'Mission Impossible' Made the Leap To 4K and HDR

(3 days ago)
In the run up to the release of Fallout, the new movie in the Mission Impossible franchise, Paramount studio re-released the entire Mission Impossible series on 4K Blu-ray last month. The new discs aren't only a huge upgrade for cinephiles -- they're also a fascinating glimpse at how studios can revive older films for the 4K/HDR era. Engadget: "In terms of any re-transfers or remastering that we are doing for our HDR releases, we will go back to the highest resolution source available," Kirsten Pielstick, manager of Paramount's digital mastering group, said in an interview. In the case of Mission Impossible 1 and 2, that involved scanning the original 35mm negatives in 4K/16-bit. As you'd expect, the studio tries to get the original artists involved with any remasters, especially with something like HDR, which allows for higher brightness and more nuanced black levels. Pielstick worked with the director of photography (DP) for the first Mission Impossible film, Stephen H. Burum, to make sure its noir-like palette stayed intact. [...] "Our mastering philosophy here is always to work directly with the talent whenever possible, and use the new technology to enhance the movie, but always stay true to the intent of the movie," Pielstick said. "You're not going to want to make things brighter just because you can, if it's not the intent of how you were supposed to see things." [...] "You also have to remember that we're not putting in anything that didn't exist on the film [for HD[..]

America Movil says AT&T-Time Warner deal will not change Latam market

(3 days ago)
The CEO of America Movil, Latin America's largest telecommunications company by subscriber numbers, said on Wednesday that AT&T Inc's acquisition of Time Warner will do little to change the telecoms landscape in the region.

Amazon.com's stock market value hits $900 billion, threatens Apple

(3 days ago)
Amazon.com's stock market value reached $900 billion on Wednesday for the first time, marking a major milestone in its 21-year trajectory as a publicly listed company and threatening to dislodge Apple as Wall Street's most valuable jewel.

Why Startups Aren't Pushing the Feds To Break Up Big Tech

(3 days ago)
An anonymous reader shares a report: Today's tech startups have largely stayed out of the debate over whether antitrust law should be used to humble -- and possibly break up -- giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon. Startups are often in position to lead the antitrust charge against major competitors. But entrepreneurs face a dilemma: If they go running to regulators, they have to admit they're in danger and tick off a powerful player in their world. If they do nothing, they risk bleeding out. [...] Tech giants have immense leverage over startups. "The tech hypercaps have never been more powerful relative to startups, including Microsoft in the '90s," said Sam Altman, the president of startup accelerator Y Combinator. "[T]he resources are so mismatched it's an unfair fight." Startups (or larger competitors) can confidentially press their case before staff members at the Department of Justice or the Federal Trade Commission, or the startups can go public with their concerns. With the exception of Yelp, there are no major startups in the U.S. that have turned to regulators to take on today's biggest companies, like Facebook, Amazon, or Google. [...] Why startups don't lodge antitrust complaints: "Running a startup, running a growth company there's so many things to do, and every hour is precious," said Albert Wenger, a managing partner at Union Square Ventures.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon Responds After Third-Party Sellers Put Bootleg Games on Its Store

(3 days ago)
Jeff Grubb, reporting for VentureBeat: Over the weekend, some thrifty gamers spotted a deal on Amazon. A downloadable version of the tough strategy survival sim Frostpunk was available on the Amazon Marketplace from a third-party seller for $3, which is a 90 percent discount from the standard $30 price. But after looking into the game, some customers who dropped the three bucks had some questions. For example, why does the metadata for this version of Frostpunk refer to the DRM-free version that people can buy from GOG. [...] So I reached out to Amazon, and it provided the following statement from a company spokesperson: "Our customers trust that when they make a purchase through Amazon's store --either directly from Amazon or from its third-party sellers -- they will receive authentic products, and we take any claims that endanger that trust seriously. We strictly prohibit the sale of counterfeit products, and these games have been removed." That's all it would say on this.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Appeals Court Won't Take Up Copyright Decision That Raised Alarm About Embedding, Linking

(3 days ago)
The 2nd Circuit denies an immediate appeal in a case that challenges how news organizations used embedded photos of Tom Brady. The Hollywood Reporter: Back in February, a New York judge caused a bit of a freakout by issuing a copyright decision regarding the embedding of a copyrighted photo of NFL superstar Tom Brady. Now comes another surprise with potentially big ramifications to the future of embedding and in-line linking: The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals has denied an interlocutory appeal. Justin Goldman is the plaintiff in the lawsuit after finding the photo of the New England Patriots quarterback he shot and uploaded to Snapchat go viral. Many news organizations embedded social media posts that took Goldman's photo in stories about whether the Boston Celtics would recruit NBA star Kevin Durant with Brady's assistance. Breitbart, Heavy, Time, Yahoo, Vox Media, Gannett Company, Herald Media, Boston Globe Media Partners and New England Sports Network were defendants in the lawsuit, but many of these companies have since settled. Heavy has not, and in February, U.S. District Court Judge Katherine Forrest shocked many legal observers with a decision that refused to apply the "Server Test," where the direct liability of a website publisher for copyright infringement turns on whether the image is hosted on the publisher's own server or is embedded or linked from a third-party server. Although the Server Test has been adopted in other jurisdictions, Forrest wrote, "The plain[..]

America Movil says still evaluating bid on Brazil's Cemig

(3 days ago)
America Movil, Latin America's largest telecoms firm by number of subscribers, said on Wednesday that it is still evaluating whether to participate in the sale of Brazil's Cemig Telecom.

Alibaba to buy minority stake in Focus Media to tap digital marketing

(3 days ago)
Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd on Wednesday said it has agreed to acquire a minority stake in China's Focus Media Information Technology Co Ltd to tap into the digital marketing sector.

Top Voting Machine Vendor Admits It Installed Remote-Access Software on Systems Sold to States

(3 days ago)
Kim Zetter, reporting for Motherboard: The nation's top voting machine maker has admitted in a letter to a federal lawmaker that the company installed remote-access software on election-management systems it sold over a period of six years, raising questions about the security of those systems and the integrity of elections that were conducted with them. In a letter sent to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) in April and obtained recently by Motherboard, Election Systems and Software acknowledged that it had "provided pcAnywhere remote connection software ... to a small number of customers between 2000 and 2006," which was installed on the election-management system ES&S sold them. The statement contradicts what the company told me and fact checkers for a story I wrote for the New York Times in February. At that time, a spokesperson said ES&S had never installed pcAnywhere on any election system it sold. "None of the employees, ⦠including long-tenured employees, has any knowledge that our voting systems have ever been sold with remote-access software," the spokesperson said. ES&S did not respond on Monday to questions from Motherboard, and it's not clear why the company changed its response between February and April. Lawmakers, however, have subpoena powers that can compel a company to hand over documents or provide sworn testimony on a matter lawmakers are investigating, and a statement made to lawmakers that is later proven false can have greater consequence[..]

Google, hit with record $5 billion EU antitrust fine, to appeal

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators hit Google with a record 4.34 billion euro ($5 billion) fine on Wednesday for using its Android mobile operating system to squeeze out rivals, and Google said it would appeal.

Google, hit with record $5 billion EU antitrust fine, to appeal

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators hit Google with a record 4.34 billion euro ($5 billion) fine on Wednesday for using its Android mobile operating system to squeeze out rivals, and Google said it would appeal.

Amazon sells more than 100 million products on Prime Day event

(3 days ago)
Amazon.com Inc said online shoppers purchased more than 100 million products worldwide during its Prime Day sale, despite glitches on its mobile app and websites that prevented customers from placing orders.

Secretive Startup Zoox Is Building a Bidirectional Autonomous Car From the Ground Up

(3 days ago)
A secretive Australian startup called Zoox (an abbreviation of zooxanthellae, the algae that helps fuel coral reef growth) is working on an autonomous vehicle that is unlike any other. Theirs is all-electric and bidirectional, meaning it can cruise into a parking spot traveling one way and cruise out the other. It can make noises to communicate with pedestrians. It even has displays on the windows for passengers to interact with. Bloomberg sheds some light on this company, reporting on their ambitions to build the safest and most inventive autonomous vehicle on the road: Zoox founders Tim Kentley-Klay and Jesse Levinson say everyone else involved in the race to build a self-driving car is doing it wrong. Both founders sound quite serious as they argue that Zoox is obvious, almost inevitable. The world will eventually move to perfectly engineered robotic vehicles, so why waste time trying to incorporate self-driving technology into yesteryear's cars? Levinson, whose father, Arthur, ran Genentech Inc., chairs Apple Inc., and mentored Steve Jobs, comes from Silicon Valley royalty. Together, they've raised an impressive pile of venture capital: about $800 million to date, including $500 million in early July at a valuation of $3.2 billion. Even with all that cash, Zoox will be lucky to make it to 2020, when it expects to put its first vehicles on the road. Smack dab in the middle of Silicon Valley sits the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The most distinguishing thing about[..]

SAP sales software pitch gets high marks, execution now key

(3 days ago)
Germany-based SAP's late push into fast-growing sales and marketing software has won Europe's most valuable technology company plaudits from industry analysts. Now it must show it can deliver.

EU's fine on Google is 'excellent decision': French government

(3 days ago)
The French government said on Wednesday that it welcomed the record 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) fine imposed on Google by European Union regulators, with a government spokesman describing it as an "excellent decision".

EU's fine on Google is 'excellent decision': French government

(3 days ago)
The French government said on Wednesday that it welcomed the record 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) fine imposed on Google by European Union regulators, with a government spokesman describing it as an "excellent decision".

Germany forces 1,050 Tesla owners to forgo electric car bonus

(3 days ago)
Germany's Federal Office for Economic Affairs and Export Control said 1,050 owners of a Tesla Model S will be forced to forgo a 2,000 euro electric car subsidy because the value of their vehicles had surpassed an eligibility threshold.

After record Google fine, EU's Vestager says she likes the U.S

(3 days ago)
EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said she "very much liked" the United States, countering a reported remark by President Donald Trump that she "hated" the country because of her antitrust actions against U.S. firms.

After record Google fine, EU's Vestager says she likes the U.S

(3 days ago)
EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said she "very much liked" the United States, countering a reported remark by President Donald Trump that she "hated" the country because of her antitrust actions against U.S. firms.

After record Google fine, Vestager says she likes the U.S.

(3 days ago)
EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said she "very much liked the U.S." following a record-setting 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) fine for Google for using its Android mobile operating system the thwart rivals.

After record Google fine, Vestager says she likes the U.S.

(3 days ago)
EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said she "very much liked the U.S." following a record-setting 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) fine for Google for using its Android mobile operating system the thwart rivals.

3D-printed gun blueprints given go-ahead by US government

(3 days ago)
After a four-year battle with the US government, Defense Distributed can publish blueprints for guns.

Google hit with record $5 billion EU antitrust fine

(3 days ago)
EU regulators hit Google with a record 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) antitrust fine on Wednesday for using its Android mobile operating system to squeeze out rivals.

Google says will appeal EU fine

(3 days ago)
Google said it will appeal against a record 4.34-billion-euro ($5.04 billion) fine levied by EU antitrust regulators on Wednesday over illegal restrictions on Android smartphone makers and mobile network operators.

Google's antitrust cases in Europe

(3 days ago)
BRUSSELS - Alphabet unit Google was hit with a record-breaking 4.34 billion euro ($5.04 billion) fine on Wednesday, topping the 2.4 billion euros it was ordered to pay in another case last year.

Google hit with record $5 billion EU antitrust fine

(3 days ago)
EU regulators hit Google with a record 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) antitrust fine on Wednesday for using its Android mobile operating system to squeeze out rivals.

Google says will appeal EU fine

(3 days ago)
Google said it will appeal against a record 4.34-billion-euro ($5.04 billion) fine levied by EU antitrust regulators on Wednesday over illegal restrictions on Android smartphone makers and mobile network operators.

Uber hires former adviser to David Cameron to lead lobbying in northern Europe

(3 days ago)
Uber Technologies has hired an ex-adviser to former British prime minister David Cameron to lead the ride-hailing firm's lobbying efforts in northern Europe, less than a month after the company won a reprieve to operate in London.

Google's antitrust cases in Europe

(3 days ago)
BRUSSELS - Alphabet unit Google was hit with a record-breaking 4.34 billion euro ($5.04 billion) fine on Wednesday, topping the 2.4 billion euros it was ordered to pay in another case last year.

EU regulators fine Google record $5 billion in Android case

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators levied a record 4.34-billion-euro($5.04 billion) fine against Google on Wednesday for illegal restrictions on Android smartphone makers and mobile network operators.

Video Raises Concerns About Excessive Thermal Throttling On 2018 MacBook Pro With Intel Core i9

(3 days ago)
Last week, Apple announced new MacBook Pros, including a 15-inch model that supports Intel's 6-core 2.9GHz i9 processor. YouTube Dave Lee managed to get his hands on this top-of-the-line device early and run some tests, revealing that the laptop gets severely throttled due to thermal issues. 9to5Mac reports: Dave Lee this afternoon shared a new video on the Core i9 MacBook Pro he purchased, and according to his testing, the new machine is unable to maintain even its base clock speed after just a short time doing processor intensive work like video editing. "This CPU is an unlocked, overclockable chip but all of that CPU potential is wasted inside this chassis -- or more so the thermal solution that's inside here," says Lee. He goes on to share some Premiere Pro render times that suggest the new 2018 MacBook Pro with Core i9 chip underperforms compared to a 2017 model with a Core i7 chip. It took 39 minutes for the 2018 MacBook Pro to render a video that the older model was able to render in 35 minutes. Premiere Pro is not well-optimized for macOS, but the difference between the two MacBook Pro models is notable. Lee ran the same test again with the 2018 MacBook Pro in the freezer, and in cooler temperatures, the i9 chip was able to offer outstanding performance, cutting that render time down to 27 minutes and beating out the 2017 MacBook Pro.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

EU Regulators Fine Google Record $5 Billion in Android Case

(3 days ago)
The European Union hit Alphabet's Google with a record antitrust fine of $5.06 billion on Monday, a decision that could loosen the company's grip on its biggest growth engine: mobile phones. From a report:The European Commission ordered Google to end the illegal conduct within 90 days or face additional penalties of up to 5 percent of parent Alphabetâ(TM)s average daily worldwide turnover. The EU enforcer also dismissed Google's arguments citing Apple as a competitor to Android devices, saying the iPhone maker does not sufficiently constrain Google because of its higher prices and switching costs for users. The European Commission finding is the most consequential decision made in its eight-year antitrust battle with Google. The fine significantly outstrips the $2.8B charge Brussels imposed on the company last year for favoring its own site in comparison shopping searches. The decision takes aim at a core part of Google's business strategy over the past decade, outlawing restrictions on its Android operating system that allegedly entrenched Google's dominance in online search at a time when consumers were moving from desktop to mobile devices. Android is the operating system used in more than 80 per cent of the world's smartphones and is vital to the group's future revenues as more users rely on mobile gadgets for search services. Google has denied wrongdoing.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

EU regulators fine Google record $5 billion in Android case

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators levied a record 4.34-billion-euro($5.04 billion) fine against Google on Wednesday for illegal restrictions on Android smartphone makers and mobile network operators.

Grab to set up artificial intelligence lab with Singapore university

(3 days ago)
Southeast Asia's Grab is jointly investing S$6 million ($4.4 million) with the National University of Singapore to launch an artificial intelligence (AI) laboratory to help improve the efficiency and utilization of vehicles on its platform.

EU to hit Google with 4.3 billion euro fine in Android case: source

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators will on Wednesday levy a 4.3-billion-euro ($5 billion) on Google for using its dominant Android mobile operating system to block rivals, a person familiar with the matter said.

EU to hit Google with 4.3 billion euro fine in Android case: source

(3 days ago)
EU antitrust regulators will on Wednesday levy a 4.3-billion-euro ($5 billion) on Google for using its dominant Android mobile operating system to block rivals, a person familiar with the matter said.

Reaping rewards

(3 days ago)
Digital technology can transform the lives of farmers as they discover how apps and blockchain offer new ways of doing business.
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