Technology News

Firefox Zero-Day Was Used In Attack Against Coinbase Employees, Not Its Users

(4 days ago)
An anonymous reader writes: A recent Firefox zero-day that has made headlines across the tech news world this week was actually used in attacks against Coinbase employees, and not the company's users. Furthermore, the attacks used not one, but two Firefox zero-days, according to Philip Martin, a member of the Coinbase security team, which reported the attacks to Mozilla. One was an RCE reported by a Google Project Zero security researcher to Mozilla in April, and the second was a sandbox escape that was spotted in the wild by the Coinbase team together with the RCE, on Monday. The question here is how an attacker managed to get hold of the details for the RCE vulnerability and use it for his attacks after the vulnerability was privately reported to Mozilla by Google. The attacker could have found the Firefox RCE on his own, he could have bribed a Mozilla/Google insider, hacked a Mozilla/Google employee and viewed details about the RCE, or hacked Mozilla's bug tracker, like another attacker did in 2015.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Himalayas Are in Even Worse Shape Than We Thought

(4 days ago)
New research shows just how much global warming is eating away at the glaciers on the world's highest peaks. From a report: A new study published this week in Science Advances offers one of the most comprehensive views of what's happening to the glaciers in the Himalayas -- and what it means for the people who live below them. The study, led by Joshua Maurer, a Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, analyzed 40 years worth of satellite images of around 650 glaciers across more than 1,200 miles of India, China, Nepal, and Bhutan. One of the largest ice loss studies to date (in both area and timespan), it not only confirms that climate change is the main contributing factor to glacial retreat in high-mountain Asia, but also reveals how fast rising temperatures are changing the face of the planet. According to the study, glaciers in the region have been losing the equivalent of more than a vertical foot and a half of ice each year since the turn of the millennia -- which is twice the rate of melting between 1975 to 2000.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Slack surges 50% in unusual listing, grabs $23 billion valuation

(4 days ago)
Shares of Slack Technologies Inc surged 50 percent in their debut through a direct listing on Thursday, giving the workplace messaging app owner a valuation of about $23 billion.

Philippines' Globe Telecoms launches 5G service backed by Huawei equipment

(4 days ago)
Philippines' Globe Telecom Inc on Thursday launched Southeast Asia's first 5G broadband service, with embattled Huawei Technologies Co Ltd providing the equipment, a win for the Chinese firm despite cybersecurity worries from Western nations.

Music Industry Targets Troll Farms Distorting Streaming Revenues

(4 days ago)
A music industry hit parade including Spotify, Amazon and Universal is moving to stifle an emerging threat to the sector's business model: fake streams [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; an alternative source was not immediately available.] From a report: [...] A growing army of online bots posing as human listeners is distorting the distribution of these revenues, inflating listening figures for certain tracks to earn higher royalty payments and chart placings. A coalition of 21 technology groups, record labels and music publishers on Thursday agreed a "code of best practices", in the first collective push by the biggest players in music to combat stream manipulation. The group, which also includes Warner Music and Sony Music, warned that "industrial-scale" impersonation of users by "troll farms" was distorting perceptions of what music is popular, according to the document seen by the Financial Times, and vowed to thwart such manipulation by weeding out the bots from the music fans.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Keep calm and buy more avocados: Walmart-Cornershop deal falls

(4 days ago)
Walmart and delivery app Cornershop have ditched plans to link up after Mexican anti-trust officials blocked the deal earlier this month, Cornershop co-founder Oskar Hjertonsson said on Twitter.

Goldman slashes Tesla price target by $42 on demand concerns

(4 days ago)
Goldman Sachs on Thursday cut its price target on Tesla Inc by 21%, to third lowest on the Street, on concerns about the sustainability of demand for the electric car maker's models.

Dell, HP, Microsoft, Intel Oppose Proposed Tariffs on Laptops, Tablets

(4 days ago)
Dell, HP, Microsoft and Intel have opposed U.S. President Donald Trump's proposal to include laptop computers and tablets among the Chinese goods targeted for tariffs. From a report: Dell, HP and Microsoft, which together account for 52% of the notebooks and detachable tablets sold in the United States, said the proposed tariffs would increase the cost of laptops in the country. The move would hurt consumers and the industry, and would not address the Chinese trade practices that the Trump administration's office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) seeks to remedy, the four companies said in a joint statement posted online. [...] In a separate statement, Microsoft, along with video game makers Nintendo of America and Sony Interactive Entertainment said the tariffs on video game consoles could stifle innovation, hurt consumers and put thousands of jobs at risk.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

LinkedIn jobs boost caps record FDI period for Ireland

(4 days ago)
Microsoft's LinkedIn on Thursday said it would add 800 new roles to its European headquarters in Dublin, the latest major jobs announcement that capped off a record six months for foreign direct investment (FDI) into Ireland.

Florida City Pays $600,000 To Ransomware Gang To Have Its Data Back

(4 days ago)
The city council for Riviera Beach, Florida, voted this week to pay more than $600,000 to a ransomware gang so city officials could recover data that has been locked and encrypted more than three weeks ago. From a report: The city's decision, as reported by CBS News, came after officials came to the conclusion that there was no other way to recover the city's files. Access to Riviera City data has been locked since May 29, this year, when a Riviera Beach police department employee opened an email and unleashed ransomware on the city's network. The ransomware locked files and shut down all the city's services. Operations have been down ever since, with the exception of 911 services, which were able to continue to operate, although limited. The city's website, email server, billing system, and everything else has been down ever since, with all city communications being done in person, over the telephone, or via posters. The city has been having a hard time recovering from the incident ever since.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Alexa, how can I fly to Mumbai?

(4 days ago)
When Karan Mehrotra booked a flight from Delhi to Guwahati, he did not go to a travel agent or an airline website.

Alexa, how can I fly to Mumbai?

(4 days ago)
When Karan Mehrotra booked a flight from Delhi to Guwahati, he did not go to a travel agent or an airline website.

Chainalysis, LINE unit BITBOX in anti-money laundering partnership

(4 days ago)
Chainalysis, a start-up specializing in countering money laundering and fraud in the digital currency space, has forged a partnership with BITBOX, a cryptocurrency exchange launched in July 2018, a top official of the U.S. company said on Thursday.

Slack Is Going Public At $16 Billion Value

(4 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from NPR: In just five years, Slack has grown to have more than 10 million users and has become a verb in the process. "I'll Slack you" is shorthand for sending a message via the workplace chat platform. On Thursday, the company will take that popularity to the New York Stock Exchange, where its shares will be publicly listed for the first time. At a starting price of $26 per share set Wednesday, Slack Technologies would be worth about $16 billion. Instead of having a conventional initial public offering, Slack will enter into the market as a direct listing, which means the shares will simply be listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Most firms that pass on an IPO are widely known companies that are in good financial shape. Fortune explains what it means to enter into the market as a direct listing: "Unlike an ordinary IPO, a direct listing means the company doesn't issue any new shares and doesn't raise additional capital. It's primarily a way for company insiders to sell some of their holdings to investors, while bypassing the formidable fees and requirements of using an underwriter."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Slack to take unusual route to public markets, likely valuing it around $16 billion

(4 days ago)
Slack Technologies, the fast-growing workplace messaging and communication platform, is poised for an unusual public listing on Thursday that will see it trade on the New York Stock Exchange and could value it at around $16 billion, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Tech Companies Are Binge-Hiring Neuroscientists

(4 days ago)
pacopico writes: There's a very weird trend going on in Silicon Valley right now where tech giants like Apple, Facebook and Twitter are raiding university neuroscience labs. They're hiring people who do pretty esoteric research on animal brains and putting them in their AI divisions. According to this Bloomberg Businessweek story, part of the reason is simply that the scientists tend to be good at dealing with large amounts of data. But the bigger deal is that these researchers specialize in things like auditory and visual function and even brain/machine interfaces and are being tapped to build new products based on the brain.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Social network LinkedIn to add 800 jobs in Ireland

(4 days ago)
Microsoft's Linkedin, a social network for professionals, on Thursday said it would add 800 new jobs to its European headquarters in Dublin, the latest technology company to boost its presence in Ireland.

Dawn Capital raises $125 million for new Europe tech fund

(5 days ago)
Venture capital firm Dawn Capital said on Thursday it had raised $125 million for its latest fund which is aimed at business-to-business technology companies across Europe.

Norway Island Wants To Be World's First Time-Free Zone

(5 days ago)
Sommaroy, an island in northern Norway that means "Summer Island," wants to become the world's first time-free zone. CNN reports: On this island in West Tromso, north of the Arctic Circle, the sun doesn't set from May 18 right through to July 26, a full 69 days. The locals, having endured the long polar night from November to January, when the sun doesn't rise at all, make the most of these precious months, with no regard to conventional timekeeping. Now they want to make it official. Islanders gathered at a town hall meeting to sign a petition for a time-free zone and on June 13, Hveding met with a Norwegian member of parliament to hand over the locals' signatures and to discuss the practical and legal challenges of the initiative. Islanders hope to be free of traditional opening hours and to introduce flexibility in school and working hours. Fishing and tourism are the main industries on this island with a population of little more than 300 people.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Renault, Nissan join Waymo in exploring driverless services in France, Japan

(5 days ago)
French automaker Renault SA, its Japanese partner Nissan Motor Co and tech giant Alphabet Inc's Waymo are exploring a partnership to develop and use self-driving vehicles to transport people and goods in France and Japan, the companies said on Thursday.

Facebook 'mysteriously locks out Hungarian users'

(5 days ago)
The social network has disabled a large number of accounts in error, according to reports.

Gambling: Four ads banned from Looney Tunes app

(5 days ago)
The game - considered appealing to under 18s - gave players the chance to earn "gems" by viewing ads.

Amazon executive Werner Vogels on the ethics of facial recognition

(5 days ago)
Amazon executive Werner Vogels tells the BBC's Dave Lee that the firm is can not be held responsible for how its artificial intelligence technology is used.

Pokemon Sword and Shield: Hands-on with Dynamax power

(5 days ago)
Chris Fox tests how the new Dynamax power to make the pet monsters huge affects gameplay.

How a struggling airline went soaring through the cloud

(5 days ago)
In a "David and Goliath" battle of the skies, the small airline used tech to punch above its weight.

The super-tough drones and robots going where we can't

(5 days ago)
How do you build unmanned vehicles that can withstand extreme temperatures, pressures and terrains?

How to cope with email overload

(5 days ago)
It might be inefficient but we still use email, despite the emergence of rival systems.

'#IAmHere': The people trying to make Facebook a nicer place

(5 days ago)
A huge network of volunteers is fighting hate speech on Facebook using closed groups.

How fish and shrimps could be recruited as underwater spies

(5 days ago)
Animals have long been used for military purposes, but could marine creatures also act as sensors?

Online porn age-checks for under-18s 'face new delay'

(5 days ago)
Changes aimed at stopping under-18s viewing explicit content were due to come into force next month.

Brooklyn-Based Artist Jason Isolini Is Hacking Google To Create Surreal Street View Art

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader shares a report from Motherboard: Brooklyn-based artist Jason Isolini worked as a contractor for Google Maps, capturing 360-images inside businesses and uploading them. Now, instead of capturing true-to-live panorama images, Isolini is uploading surreal collages that subvert the purpose of Google Maps: to be a tool that brings users from their current location to a business. "Since August 2017, Isolini has made 42 'contributions' to the Google Maps landscape and they've accumulated just shy of 200,000 views," the report says. "In some of his earlier works, Isolini inserted collages of photos -- like street signs, monopoly pieces, laundry detergent bottles -- into spaces around Brooklyn." "More recently, in addition to his memorial at the site of the accident at Mill Avenue and Washington Street [in Temple, Arizona, where a self-driving car developed by Uber struck and killed Elaine Herzberg in March 2018], he's superimposed his work onto 360-degree views of art buildings like the Simon Lee Gallery and inserted a images of abandonment and destruction over the entrance to the Apple Store on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. A cigarette, a broken glass screen, USB ports on a slab of stone, leading to nowhere."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Delta Air not expecting flight cancellations as result of tech issue

(5 days ago)
Delta Air Lines Inc said it was not expecting flight cancellations as a result of a technical glitch that had affected booking, check-in and boarding services.

Millionaire Hacker Gets 9 Years In Death of Man Building Nuclear Bunker Tunnels

(5 days ago)
A wealthy stock trader and "skilled computer hacker" was sentenced Monday to nine years in prison for the fiery death of a man who was helping him secretly dig tunnels for a nuclear bunker beneath a Maryland home. Baltimore Sun reports: Daniel Beckwitt, 28, had faced a maximum of 30 years in prison when Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Margaret Schweitzer sentenced him. In total, Beckwitt was sentenced to 21 years but the judge suspended all but nine years of the sentence. In April, a jury convicted Beckwitt of second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter in the September 2017 death of 21-year-old Askia Khafra. During the trial, Montgomery County prosecutor Marybeth Ayres accused Beckwitt of recklessly endangering Khafra's life. Beckwitt ignored obvious signs of danger and sacrificed safety for secrecy while they dug a network of tunnels beneath a home in Bethesda, a suburb of Washington, D.C., the prosecutor said. Defense attorney Robert Bonsib had told jurors the fire was an accident, not a crime. Firefighters found Khafra's naked, charred body in the basement of Beckwitt's trash-filled house, only a few steps from an exit. Prosecutors said the extreme hoarding conditions in the home prevented Khafra from escaping. Hours before the fire broke out in the basement, Khafra texted Beckwitt to warn him it smelled like smoke in the tunnels. Ayres said Beckwitt didn't respond for more than six hours before telling Khafra that there had been a "major electrical failure."[..]

Microsoft's Chromium Edge Browser Now Available On Windows 7 and Windows 8

(5 days ago)
The Chromium-powered Edge browser is now available on both Windows 7 and Windows 8 for testing today. The Verge reports: The release comes two months after Chromium Edge first debuted on Windows 10, and a month after it appeared on macOS. Microsoft is releasing the daily Canary builds initially, and plans to support the weekly Dev channel "soon." You can download the installer over at Microsoft's Edge Insider site. "You will find the experience and feature set on previous versions of Windows to be largely the same as on Windows 10, including forthcoming support for Internet Explorer mode for our enterprise customers," explains a Microsoft Edge team blog post. While most features will be the same, dark mode is missing and Microsoft says there is no support for AAD sign-in.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Boeing To Use Computer Simulations Instead of Physical Certification Tests For Some Aircraft

(5 days ago)
New submitter Falconhell writes: In an ironic turn of events, Boeing wants to skip some physical certification tests and use only simulations. Given their current situation, this seems like a rather controversial move. Boeing is "reducing the scope and duration of certain costly physical tests used to certify the planemaker's new aircraft," Reuters first reported over the weekend. The manufacturer wants to switch to software-based trials for things such as wing load testing, "instead of doing things like bending actual, and highly expensive, components until they snap," adds The Register.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New York State Lawmakers Agree To Pass a Sweeping Climate Plan

(5 days ago)
New York lawmakers have agreed to pass a sweeping climate plan that could help the state achieve a net-zero economy in which all energy is drawn from carbon-free sources by 2050. "The bill would require New York to get 70 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030, and by 2050, the state would have to cut emissions by at least 85 percent below 1990 levels," reports New York Magazine. "To offset the remainder, the state would enact measures to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, like mass tree-planting and the restoration of wetlands." From the report: The bill, if passed, would be one of the world's most ambitious climate plans, made more impressive by the size of New York's economy. If the state were its own country, its economy would be the 11th largest in the world, falling between those of Canada and South Korea. "This unquestionably puts New York in a global leadership position," Jesse Jenkins, an energy expert and postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, told the New York Times. Of course, energy costs will go up in pursuit of the goal. New York gets around 60 percent of its electricity from carbon-free sources -- primarily an energy mix of hydroelectric and nuclear power. To make up the difference, the state will invest in large-scale offshore wind farms and rooftop solar projects. More challenging than the electric grid is the heat for homes and commercial buildings, which generally burn natural gas or oil, and take up around a quarter of the state's[..]

One Day of Work a Week Is Most 'Effective' Dose For Mental Health, Study Says

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Just one day of work per week is the most "effective dose" to give the mental health benefits of paid employment, research suggests. A study indicated that the risk of mental health problems reduces by 30% when people move from unemployment or stay-at-home parenting into paid work of eight hours or less per week. But researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Salford found no evidence that working any more than eight hours provided further boosts to well-being. The researchers used data from a panel survey to examine how changes in working hours were linked to mental health and life satisfaction in more than 70,000 UK residents between 2009 and 2018. They controlled for characteristics including age, children, longstanding illness and household income. The study suggests that to get the mental well-being benefits of paid work, the most "effective dose" is only around one day a week -- as anything more makes little difference. The research has been published in the journal Social Science & Medicine.Read more of this story at Slashdot.
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