Technology News

VW embarks on $50 billion electrification plan

(5 days ago)
Volkswagen plans to spend 44 billion euros ($50 billion) on electric cars, autonomous driving and new mobility services by 2023 and explore closer cooperation with Ford, the German company said on Friday.

Jeff Bezos To Employees: 'One Day, Amazon Will Fail' But Our Job is To Delay it as Long as Possible

(5 days ago)
Days before Amazon announced the cities it had picked for its HQ2, CEO Jeff Bezos had to address a separate but related concern among employees: Where is all this headed? At an all-hands meeting last Thursday in Seattle, an employee asked Bezos about Amazon's future. Specifically, the questioner wanted to know what lessons Bezos has learned from the recent bankruptcies of Sears and other big retailers. From a report: "Amazon is not too big to fail," Bezos said, in a recording of the meeting that CNBC has heard. "In fact, I predict one day Amazon will fail. Amazon will go bankrupt. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be 30-plus years, not a hundred-plus years." The key to prolonging that demise, Bezos continued, is for the company to "obsess over customers" and to avoid looking inward, worrying about itself. "If we start to focus on ourselves, instead of focusing on our customers, that will be the beginning of the end," he said. "We have to try and delay that day for as long as possible." Bezos' comments come at a time of unprecedented success at Amazon, with its core retail business continuing to grow while the company is winning the massive cloud-computing market and gaining rapid adoption of its Alexa voice assistant in the home.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Viacom signs multi-picture film deal with Netflix

(5 days ago)
Viacom Inc's Paramount Pictures Chief Executive Officer Jim Gianopulos said on Friday it has signed a multi-picture film deal with Netflix Inc.

'The Internet Needs More Friction'

(5 days ago)
Justin Kosslyn, who leads product management at Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet that builds technology to address global security challenges, writes: The Internet's lack of friction made it great, but now our devotion to minimizing friction is perhaps the internet's weakest link for security. Friction -- delays and hurdles to speed and growth -- can be a win-win-win for users, companies, and security. It is time to abandon our groupthink bias against friction as a design principle. Highways have speed limits and drugs require prescriptions -- rules that limit how fast you can drive a vehicle or access a controlled substance -- yet digital information moves limitlessly. The same design philosophy that accelerated the flow of correspondence, news, and commerce also accelerates the flow of phishing, ransomware, and disinformation. In the old days, it took time and work to steal secrets, blackmail people, and meddle across borders. Then came the internet. From the beginning, it was designed as a frictionless communication platform across countries, companies, and computers. Reducing friction is generally considered a good thing: it saves time and effort, and in many genuine ways makes our world smaller. There are also often financial incentives: more engagement, more ads, more dollars. But the internet's lack of friction has been a boon to the dark side, too. Now, in a matter of hours a "bad actor" can steal corporate secrets or use ransomware to blackmail thousands of people.[..]

Europe 5G network buildout to trigger deals, won't bust capex budgets

(5 days ago)
The launch of fifth-generation mobile services across Europe looks set to trigger a wave of infrastructure deals as telecoms companies seek ways to upgrade their networks without busting their strained capital budgets.

Europe 5G network buildout to trigger deals, won't bust capex budgets

(5 days ago)
The launch of fifth-generation mobile services across Europe looks set to trigger a wave of infrastructure deals as telecoms companies seek ways to upgrade their networks without busting their strained capital budgets.

VW says could build up to 15 million electric cars

(5 days ago)
Volkswagen could build up to 15 million electric cars over several years on its new electric vehicle production platform, the company said on Friday, adding that its Chief Executive Herbert Diess had misspoken in an interview on Monday.

Volkswagen to spend 44 billion euros on electric, autonomous cars by 2023

(5 days ago)
Volkswagen on Friday said it will spend 44 billion euros on electric cars, digitalization, autonomous driving and new mobility services by 2023 as part of a push by Europe's largest carmaker to mass produce electric cars.

Supply glut mars Turing effect for Nvidia shares

(5 days ago)
Worries about how fast the computing world will transition to Nvidia Corp's next generation "Turing" graphic chips helped knock 20 percent off the value of its shares on Friday, after results pointed to a huge glut of unsold older generation chips.

FCC Paves the Way For Improved GPS Accuracy

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) paved the way for improved GPS and location accuracy today, approving an order that will allow U.S. phones to access a European satellite system. The order allows non-federal consumer devices to access the European Union's version of GPS, which is also known as Galileo. The system is available globally, and it officially went live in 2016. By opening up access, devices that can retrieve a signal from both Galileo and the U.S. GPS system will see improved timing estimates and location reliability. The iPhone 8 was the first Apple product to support it. Other phone models from Huawei and Samsung support the system, too. "Since the debut of the first consumer handheld GPS device in 1989, consumers and industry in the United States have relied on the U.S. GPS to support satellite-based positioning, navigation, and timing services that are integral to everyday applications ranging from driving directions to precision farming," the FCC said in a release. Now, the U.S. system will be able to commingle with the European one, making the way for better reliability, range, and accuracy.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Russia stifled mobile network during protests: document

(5 days ago)
Russian authorities ordered two mobile operators to cut most access to mobile data services in the region of Ingushetia as protesters were massing outside government offices there, according to a document from the state telecoms regulator.

Award for wartime flight trainer returned to service

(5 days ago)
Tens of thousands of pilots trained in a tiny, mechanical flight simulator which has been restored.

EU executive poised to propose tariffs on Chinese e-bikes

(5 days ago)
The European Commission is set to propose final duties to curb cheap imports of Chinese electric bicycles that European producers say are benefiting from unfair subsidies and flooding the European Union market.

Remote Workers Can Get a Cushy Apartment, Free Office Space, and $10K If They Move To Tulsa

(5 days ago)
Tulsa, Oklahoma is offering full-time remote workers in the U.S. free office space, a subsidized furnished apartment, and $10,000 cash if you move there and stay for at least one year. The city wants to attract so-called "digital nomads," who would, presumably, start paying taxes, launch businesses, and otherwise contribute to the economy of wherever they're drawn to. Nextgov reports: Tulsa Remote is one of several revitalization projects in the region funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation. The Tulsa-based philanthropic organization was started by George B. Kaiser, an oil and banking billionaire who has signed on to Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates' "Giving Pledge," whose wealthy signees promise to give away at least half their fortunes to charity. The organization has budgeted for 20 new remote workers in the program's first year, says Ken Levit, GKFF's executive director. Applicants must be at least 18, eligible to work in the U.S., already working full-time for an employer based outside the boundaries of Tulsa County, and prepared to move to Tulsa within six months. Applications opened Tuesday at the website TulsaRemote.com; the city hopes to settle the first new residents within the next three months, Levit said.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

India's Flipkart Group fashion unit chief denies he is quitting

(5 days ago)
The chief of Flipkart Group's Myntra-Jabong fashion business on Friday denied a media report that he will quit after a reshuffle in the ranks following the ouster of group CEO Binny Bansal.

EE and Virgin Media fined £13.3m for overcharging customers

(5 days ago)
The companies overcharged phone and broadband customers leaving their contracts early, Ofcom says.

'How Amazon helped me transition to a woman'

(5 days ago)
Sophie Roberts is a software developer at the tech giant who came out at work in October.

Google Is Closing Its Schaft Robotics Unit

(5 days ago)
Google's parent company Alphabet is closing down Schaft, its secretive unit that develops bipedal robots aimed at helping out in disaster efforts. The news was first reported by Nikkei, but Alphabet confirmed to TechCrunch that the business will be shuttered. It said it is helping staff find new roles, most of which will likely be outside of Google and its Alphabet parent. TechCrunch reports: The company was scheduled to be sold to SoftBank alongside Boston Dynamics -- another of Alphabet's robotics ventures -- through a deal that was announced last year. Boston Dynamics made the transition but Schaft didn't. Softbank never shouted that omission from the rooftops, but a source with knowledge of the deal told us that certain conditions agreed for the deal were not fulfilled, hence Schaft remained with Alphabet. Our source explained that Alphabet's robotics focused shifted away from Schaft and instead to non-humanoid robots and industry-led solutions such as robotic arms. The departure of Andy Rubin, the controversial robotics evangelist who reportedly got a $90 million payout to leave amid sexual misconduct allegations, seemed to speed up its demise inside the organization. Alphabet shopped the Schaft business fairly widely -- since 2016 and after the SoftBank deal collapsed -- but to no avail, we understand. That left closing it down as the last remaining option.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Thai proposal for all-powerful cyber agency alarms businesses, activists

(5 days ago)
A proposed cybersecurity law in Thailand would give a new government agency sweeping powers to spy on internet traffic, order the removal of content, or even seize computers without judicial oversight, alarming businesses and activists.

Inventors of Omnidirectional Wind Turbine Win James Dyson Award

(6 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: A spinning turbine that can capture wind traveling in any direction and could transform how consumers generate electricity in cities has won its inventors a prestigious international award and ~$38,000 prize. Nicolas Orellana, 36, and Yaseen Noorani, 24, MSc students at Lancaster University, scooped the James Dyson award for their O-Wind Turbine, which -- in a technological first -- takes advantage of both horizontal and vertical winds without requiring steering. O-Wind Turbine is a 25cm sphere with geometric vents that sits on a fixed axis and spins when wind hits it from any direction. When wind energy turns the device, gears drive a generator that converts the power of the wind into electricity. The students believe the device, which could take at least five years to be put into commercial production, could be installed on large structures such as the side of a building or balcony, where wind speeds are highest. Dyson, who chose the winners, hailed it as "an ingenious concept." He continued: "Designing something that solves a problem is an intentionally broad brief. It invites talented, young inventors to do more than just identify real problems. It empowers them to use their ingenuity to develop inventive solutions. O-Wind Turbine does exactly that. It takes the enormous challenge of producing renewable energy and using geometry it can harness energy in places where we've scarcely been looking -- cities."Read more of[..]

Why Sleep Apnea Patients Rely On a Lone, DRM-Breaking CPAP Machine Hacker

(6 days ago)
Jason Koebler writes: "SleepyHead" is a free, open-source, and definitely not FDA-approved piece of software for sleep apnea patients that is the product of thousands of hours of hacking and development by a lone Australian developer named Mark Watkins, who has helped thousands of sleep apnea patients take back control of their treatment from overburdened and underinvested doctors. The software gives patients access to the sleep data that is already being generated by their CPAP machines but generally remains inaccessible, hidden by DRM and proprietary data formats that can only be read by authorized users (doctors) on proprietary pieces of software that patients often can't buy or download. SleepyHead and community-run forums like CPAPtalk.com and ApneaBoard.com have allowed patients to circumvent medical device manufacturers, who would prefer that the software not exist at all. Medical device manufacturers fought in 2015 to prevent an exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to legalize hacking by patients who wanted to access their own data, but an exemption was granted, legalizing SleepyHead and software like it.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Justice Department Is Preparing To Prosecute WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

(6 days ago)
According to the Wall Street Journal, "the Justice Department is preparing to prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source) and is increasingly optimistic it will be able to get him into a U.S. courtroom." From the report: Over the past year, U.S. prosecutors have discussed several types of charges they could potentially bring against Mr. Assange, the people said. Mr. Assange has lived in the Ecuadorean embassy in London since receiving political asylum from the South American country in 2012. The people familiar with the case wouldn't describe whether discussions were under way with the U.K. or Ecuador about Mr. Assange, but said they were encouraged by recent developments. Prosecutors have considered publicly indicting Mr. Assange to try to trigger his removal from the embassy, the people said, because a detailed explanation of the evidence against Mr. Assange could give Ecuadorean authorities a reason to turn him over. The exact charges Justice Department might pursue remain unclear, but they may involve the Espionage Act, which criminalizes the disclosure of national defense-related information.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Crypto hangover' hammers Nvidia's outlook, shares drop 17 percent

(6 days ago)
Chip designer Nvidia Corp on Thursday forecast disappointing sales for the holiday quarter, pinning the blame on unsold chips piling up with distributors and retailers after the evaporation of the cryptocurrency mining boom.

Facebook defends Russia response, updates plan to curb misbehavior

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc Chairman and Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday defended his response to Russian election meddling on the world's largest social media network and issued a new plan aimed at stifling misbehavior while maintaining a vibrant hub for online speech.

Facebook defends Russia response, updates plan to curb misbehavior

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc Chairman and Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday defended his response to Russian election meddling on the world's largest social media network and issued a new plan aimed at stifling misbehavior while maintaining a vibrant hub for online speech.

Facebook Claims NYT Expose Has 'A Number of Inaccuracies'

(6 days ago)
Earlier today, Facebook issued a response to a New York Times report on the social media company's handling of the many scandals it faced last year, including Russian interference and the Cambridge Analytica scandal. "There are a number of inaccuracies in the story," Facebook said in a point-by-point blog post, including that the company was aware of Russian meddling on the social platform months before taking any action. Variety reports: Facebook said it has "acknowledged publicly on many occasions" that "we were too slow to spot Russian interference on Facebook, as well as other misuse." But Facebook denied the allegation in the Times report that the company knew about Russian activity as early as the spring of 2016 and had failed to actively investigate it. The company cited CEO Mark Zuckerberg's congressional testimony from April 2018, in which he said Facebook detected threats related to Russia only in the weeks leading up to the U.S. election in November 2016. When it identified fake accounts that were used to furnish stolen information to journalists, "we shut these accounts down for violating our policies," Zuckerberg testified. Meanwhile, Facebook in October 2017 enlisted Washington, D.C.-area PR firm Definers Public Affairs, founded by Republican political strategists, as part of its crisis response to dealing with the Russia fallout. Among other activities, Definers launched a campaign linking Facebook critics to liberal billionaire George Soros, a common tactic[..]

Ecuador OKs extraditing self-proclaimed Facebook owner to U.S.: lawyer

(6 days ago)
An Ecuadorean court authorized the extradition of Paul Ceglia, a New Yorker charged with trying to defraud Facebook Inc founder Mark Zuckerberg, to the United States, Ceglia's lawyer in the Andean country said on Thursday.

China Says It Has Developed a Quantum Radar That Can See Stealth Aircraft

(6 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Digital Trends: At a recent air show in the city of Zhuhai, state-owned Chinese defense giant China Electronics Technology Group Corporation displayed what it claims to be a quantum radar that's able to detect even the stealthiest of stealth aircraft. The company claims to have been working on the technology for years, and to have tested it for the first time in 2015. In principle, a quantum radar functions like a regular radar -- only that instead of sending out a single beam of electromagnetic energy, it uses two split streams of entangled photons. Only one of these beams is sent out, but due to a quirk of quantum physics both streams will display the same changes, despite being potentially miles apart. As a result, by looking at the stream which remains back home it's possible to work out what has happened to the other beam. According to a brochure from the China Electronics Technology Group Corporation, the new quantum radar could "solve the traditional bottleneck [of] detection of low observable target detection, survival under electronic warfare conditions, [and] platform load limitations."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SpaceX Launched and Landed Another Used Falcon 9 Rocket, Marking Its Record-Tying 18th Launch of the Year

(6 days ago)
SpaceX has successfully sent up a communications satellite for the country of Qatar, marking the aerospace company's 18th mission in 2018, which ties the company's record in 2017 for the most launches done in a year. Since the company has several more missions planned for this year, it's very likely that the company will set a new all-time high soon. The Verge reports: For this mission, SpaceX is employing another one of its used rockets, a Falcon 9 booster that launched the Telstar 19 VANTAGE satellite in July. After that mission, the rocket landed on one of SpaceX's autonomous drone ships in the Atlantic Ocean, and the company hopes to pull off the same feat following today's launch. If successful, this particular Falcon 9 booster could be capable of flying a third time in the near future. The payload is the Es'hail-2 satellite, which is meant to provide communications services to the Middle East and North Africa. It's primarily meant to be used for government and commercial purposes, however, amateur radio operators can also use this satellite. Es'hail-2 has two transponders on board that can connect to amateur radios from South America to Asia. It's not the only satellite with this capability, but Es'hail-2 is going to a particularly high orbit 22,000 miles up. That will make it the first satellite at this altitude to link amateur radios from Brazil to India. SpaceX managed to successfully deploy the Es'hail-2 satellite into orbit "32 minutes after takeoff," The Verge[..]

A slew of electric truck plans may deliver the goods for China's EV ambitions

(6 days ago)
Having just broken ground for a new factory in the southern Chinese province of Hunan, the head of electric car startup Singulato Motors has grand plans: build up to 50,000 electric vans per year and ride the crest of a wave for e-truck demand in China.

Dell sweetens tracking stock offer, Icahn drops opposition

(6 days ago)
Dell Technologies on Thursday raised its offer to buy back shares tied to its interest in software maker VMware to $23.9 billion from $21.7 billion, prompting billionaire investor Carl Icahn to abandon his campaign to scupper the deal.

Uber Joins Linux Foundation Cementing Commitment To Open Source Tools

(6 days ago)
At the 2018 Uber Open Summit, Uber announced it was joining the Linux Foundation as a Gold Member, making a firm commitment to using and contributing to open source tools. TechCrunch reports: Uber CTO Thuan Pham sees the Linux Foundation as a place for companies like his to nurture and develop open source projects. "Open source technology is the backbone of many of Uber's core services and as we continue to mature, these solutions will become ever more important," he said in a blog post announcing the partnership. "Uber has made significant investments in shared software development and community collaboration through open source over the years, including contributing the popular open source project Jaeger, a distributed tracing system, to the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation in 2017," an Uber spokesperson told TechCrunch. As the report mentions, it took the ride-hailing service a long time for them to join the Linux Foundation. "Uber has been long known for making use of open source in its core tools working on over 320 open source projects and repositories from 1500 contributors involving over 70,000 commits, according to data provided by the company," reports TechCrunch.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nvidia shares slide 17 percent as cryptocurrency demand vanishes

(6 days ago)
Chip designer Nvidia Corp on Thursday forecast sales for its fiscal fourth quarter well below Wall Street expectations, pinning the blame on unsold chips piling up with distributors and retailers after the evaporation of the cryptocurrency mining boom.

Facebook plans independent body for content-removal appeals

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said on Thursday the world's largest social media service would create an independent body to review user appeals of content takedowns, saying his company should not by itself be making "so many important decisions about free expression and safety."

Facebook plans independent body for content-removal appeals

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said on Thursday the world's largest social media service would create an independent body to review user appeals of content takedowns, saying his company should not by itself be making "so many important decisions about free expression and safety."

Senators Ask Four Major Carriers About Video Slowdowns

(6 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Three U.S. Senate Democrats today asked the four major wireless carriers about allegations they've been throttling video services and -- in the case of Sprint -- the senators asked about alleged throttling of Skype video calls. Sens. Edward Markey (D-Mass.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) sent the letters to AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile, noting that recent research using the Wehe testing platform found indications of throttling by all four carriers. "All online traffic should be treated equally, and Internet service providers should not discriminate against particular content or applications for competitive advantage purposes or otherwise," the senators wrote. Specifically, the Wehe tests "indicated throttling on AT&T for YouTube, Netflix, and NBC Sports... throttling on Verizon for Amazon Prime, YouTube, and Netflix... throttling on Sprint for YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Skype Video calls... [and] delayed throttling, or boosting, on T-Mobile for Netflix, NBC Sports, and Amazon Prime by providing un-throttled streaming at the beginning of the connection, and then subsequently throttling the connection," the senators' letters said.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

U.S. senator to query Facebook about report on treatment of critics

(6 days ago)
A Democratic U.S. senator said on Thursday she will ask Facebook Inc and the Justice Department about a media report that the company hired an outside firm to attack critics, warning that such action could raise campaign finance issues.

Nvidia forecasts current-quarter revenue below estimates, shares slump

(6 days ago)
Chipmaker Nvidia Corp forecast fourth-quarter revenue below Wall Street estimates on Thursday, sending its shares down nearly 14 percent in extended trading.

How Google Photos Became a Perfect Jukebox for Our Memories

(6 days ago)
Google Photos, introduced in 2015, has become one of the most emotionally resonant pieces of technology today. It is also shaping our narratives along the way, writes The New York Times' Farhad Manjoo. From a story: Google's computers can recognize faces, even as they age over time. Photos also seems to understand the tone and emotional valence of human interaction, things like smiles, giggles, frowns, tantrums, dances of joy and even snippets of dialogue like "happy birthday!" or "good job!" The resulting montage, synced to a swelling Hollywood score, mixed obvious highlights -- birthdays, school plays -- with dozens of ordinary moments of childhood bliss. [...] This is what I mean about a sucker punch: Who expects software to make them cry? Images on Instagram and Snapchat may move you regularly, but Google Photos is not social media; it is personal media, a service begun three years ago primarily as a database to house our growing collections of private snaps -- and a service run mostly by machines, not by other humans posting and Liking stuff. And yet Google Photos has become one of the most emotionally resonant pieces of technology I regularly use. It is remarkable not just for how useful it is -- for how it has erased any headache in storing and searching through the tsunami of images we all produce. More than that, Photos is remarkable for what it portends about how we may one day understand ourselves through photography.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Fake Fingerprints Can Imitate Real Ones In Biometric Systems, Research Shows

(6 days ago)
schwit1 shares a report: Researchers have used a neural network to generate artificial fingerprints that work as a "master key" for biometric identification systems and prove fake fingerprints can be created. According to a paper [PDF] presented at a security conference in Los Angeles, the artificially generated fingerprints, dubbed "DeepMasterPrints" by the researchers from New York University, were able to imitate more than one in five fingerprints in a biometric system that should only have an error rate of one in a thousand. The researchers, led by NYU's Philip Bontrager, say that "the underlying method is likely to have broad applications in fingerprint security as well as fingerprint synthesis." As with much security research, demonstrating flaws in existing authentication systems is considered to be an important part of developing more secure replacements in the future. In order to work, the DeepMasterPrints take advantage of two properties of fingerprint-based authentication systems. The first is that, for ergonomic reasons, most fingerprint readers do not read the entire finger at once, instead imaging whichever part of the finger touches the scanner.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Silicon eyed as way to boost electric car battery potential

(6 days ago)
The race to build a better electric car battery is turning to silicon, with several companies working to engineer types of the material that can boost driving range and cut production costs.

Tesla slashes prices on home solar systems to spur sales

(6 days ago)
Tesla Inc has cut prices on its residential solar systems by as much as 25 percent in a bid to lift lagging sales after the company streamlined its sales and marketing organization, a company official told Reuters.

FDA Seeks Ban On Menthol Cigarettes To Fight Teen Smoking

(6 days ago)
The Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it will seek a ban on the sale of menthol-flavored cigarettes. From a report: The announcement came as the agency officially released a detailed plan to also restrict the sale of flavored electronic cigarettes. It also wants to ban flavored cigars. In a statement, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb says the moves are aimed at fighting smoking among young people. Flavored e-cigarettes, menthol-flavored tobacco cigarettes and flavored cigars are all popular among teenagers. "Today, I'm pursuing actions aimed at addressing the disturbing trend of youth nicotine use and continuing to advance the historic declines we've achieved in recent years in the rates of combustible cigarette use among kids," Gottlieb says. While cigarette smoking has hit a record low in the United States, vaping has been skyrocketing. That trend has raised concerns that a new generation of young people will become addicted to nicotine. Gottlieb says the moves were prompted by new data showing a 78 percent increase in e-cigarette use among high school students and a 48 percent increase among middle school students, from 2017 to 2018. "These data shock my conscience," Gottlieb says.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ex-Bosch engineers aim to strengthen self-driving car software

(6 days ago)
A company formed by two longtime self-driving car engineers is seeking to make the open-source software that powers many experimental self-driving cars safe and reliable enough to be used in commercially available vehicles.

SpaceX, TeleSat Canada bids get U.S. nod to expand satellite internet

(6 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allow Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk's Space X, Telesat Canada [PSPENC.UL] and two other companies to roll out new satellite-based broadband services.

SpaceX, TeleSat Canada bids get U.S. nod to expand satellite internet

(6 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allow Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk's Space X, Telesat Canada [PSPENC.UL] and two other companies to roll out new satellite-based broadband services.

The F-35's Greatest Vulnerability Isn't Enemy Weapons. It's Being Hacked.

(6 days ago)
schwit1 shares a report: Every F-35 squadron, no matter the country, has a 13-server ALIS package that is connected to the worldwide ALIS network. Individual jets send logistical data back to their nation's Central Point of Entry, which then passes it on to Lockheed's central server hub in Fort Worth, Texas. In fact, ALIS sends back so much data that some countries are worried it could give away too much information about their F-35 operations. Another networking system is the Joint Reprogramming Enterprise, or JRE. The JRE maintains a shared library of potential adversary sensors and weapon systems that is distributed to the worldwide F-35 fleet. For example, the JRE will seek out and share information on enemy radar and electronic warfare signals so that individual air forces will not have to track down the information themselves. This allows countries with the F-35 to tailor the mission around anticipated threats -- and fly one step ahead of them. Although the networks have serious cybersecurity protections, they will undoubtedly be targets for hackers in times of peace, and war. Hackers might try to bring down the networks entirely, snarling the worldwide logistics system and even endangering the ability of individual aircraft to get much-needed spare parts. Alternately, it might be possible to compromise the integrity of the ALIS data -- by, say, reporting a worldwide shortage of F-35 engines. Hackers could conceivably introduce bad data in the JRE that could compromise[..]
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