Technology News

A New Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Has Arrived With Bluetooth 4.2 and Dual-Band Wi-Fi For $25

(6 days ago)
Raspberry Pi has introduced a new version of one of its most popular models just in time to stuff your stocking: the Model A+. And this time around, it's even more attractive. From a report: The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ costs $25, $5 more than the previous generation, but has a lot more going for it. Just like the top-of-the-line Model B+, the new Model A+ has a 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core processor, and you'll also get dual-band Wi-Fi (2.4GHz + 5 GHz), a feature that was missing from the previous A+. And you'll have to use it, since the A+ doesn't have an Ethernet port. It does, however, have Bluetooth 4.2 on board. For $10 less than the $35 Model B+, you'll also only get a single USB port (versus four on the B+) as well as 512MB of RAM (versus 1GB on the B+). But otherwise, the devices are identical, with a full-size HDMI port, CSI camera port, DSI display port, stereo output and composite video port, and a micro SD port. The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ isn't the cheapest Pi model available -- the Zero costs $5 and the Zero W costs just $10 -- but it rounds out the options nicely. The new model is available now through Raspberry Pi retailers.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon to get billions in breaks for HQ2 development

(6 days ago)
Amazon.com Inc said on Tuesday it had split its $5 billion second headquarters into two projects that would be located in the Long Island City neighborhood of New York City's Queens borough and a Northern Virginia suburb of Washington, DC.

Facebook identifies 2.1 million posts as bullying

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc said https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2018/11/enforcing-our-community-standards-2 on Thursday it had identified about 2.1 million posts as being bullying or harassment in nature on the social network between April and September.

Amazon to get billions in breaks for HQ2 development

(6 days ago)
Amazon.com Inc said on Tuesday it had split its $5 billion second headquarters into two projects that would be located in the Long Island City neighborhood of New York City's Queens borough and a Northern Virginia suburb of Washington, DC.

Facebook identifies 2.1 million posts as bullying

(6 days ago)
Facebook Inc said https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2018/11/enforcing-our-community-standards-2 on Thursday it had identified about 2.1 million posts as being bullying or harassment in nature on the social network between April and September.

Orange's CFO sees opportunity in H1 2019 for French market consolidation

(6 days ago)
The French telecoms industry may have an opportunity in the first half of 2019 to cut the number of operators to three from four, once a process to reallocate radio frequency bands is completed at the end of the year, an Orange executive said on Thursday.

SpaceX Wins FCC Approval To Deploy 7,518 Satellites

(6 days ago)
SpaceX won permission to deploy more than 7,000 satellites, far more than all operating spacecraft currently aloft, from U.S. regulators who also moved to reduce a growing risk from space debris as skies grow more crowded. From a report: Space Exploration Technologies has two test satellites aloft, and it earlier won permission for a separate set of 4,425 satellites -- which like the 7,518 satellites authorized Thursday are designed to provide broadband communications. It has said it plans to begin launches next year. Space companies riding innovations that include smaller and cheaper satellites -- with some just 4 inches long and weighing only 3 pounds -- are planning fleets that will fly fast and low, offering communications now commonly handled by larger, more expensive satellites. Right now there are fewer than 2,000 operating satellites, and the planned additional space traffic demands vigilance, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said before the agency voted Thursday on a variety of space-related matters including SpaceX's application, debris rules, and other space matters.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla to deliver new Model 3 orders by year end

(6 days ago)
Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Thursday that Model 3s ordered in the United States by the end of this month will be delivered by Dec. 31, as the electric carmaker tries to take advantage of tax breaks.

FCC OKs SpaceX, TeleSat Canada bids to expand satellite-based internet service

(6 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allow Tesla chief executive Elon Musk's Space X, Telesat Canada and two other companies to roll out new satellite-based broadband services.

The US Military is Making Balloons That Hover at the Edge of Space, Indefinitely

(6 days ago)
A sensor that can spot the wind direction from miles away will let DARPA's surveillance balloons hover at the very edge of space in one spot indefinitely. An anonymous reader writes: DARPA, the US military's research arm, is currently testing a wind sensor that could allow devices in its Adaptable Lighter-Than-Air (ALTA) balloon program to spot wind speed and direction from a great distance and then make the necessary adjustments to stay in one spot. DARPA has been working on ALTA for some time, but its existence was only revealed in September. "By flying higher we hope to take advantage of a larger range of winds," says ALTA project manager Alex Walan. ALTA will operate even higher than Loon at 75,000 to 90,000 feet (22,900 to 27,400 meters or 14 to 17 miles), where the winds are less predictable. That shouldn't be a problem if the balloon can see exactly where the favorable winds are. The wind sensor, called Strat-OAWL (short for "stratospheric optical autocovariance wind lidar"), is a new version of one originally designed for NASA satellites. Made by Ball Aerospace, OAWL shines pulses of laser light into the air. A small fraction of the beam is reflected back, and the reflected laser light is gathered by a telescope. The wavelength of the reflected light is changed slightly depending on how fast the air it bounced back from is moving, a change known as doppler shift. By analyzing this shift, OAWL can determine the speed and direction of the wind. Unlike other wind[..]

FCC OKs SpaceX, TeleSat Canada bids to expand satellite-based internet service

(6 days ago)
WASHINGTON (Reuters - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allow Tesla chief executive Elon Musk's Space X, Telesat Canada and two other companies to roll out new satellite-based broadband services.

The Internet Has a Huge C/C++ Problem and Developers Don't Want to Deal With It

(6 days ago)
What do Heartbleed, WannaCry, and million dollar iPhone bugs have in common? From a report: One bug affects iPhones, another affects Windows, and the third affects servers running Linux. At first glance these might seem unrelated, but in reality all three were made possible because the software that was being exploited was written in programming languages which allow a category of errors called "memory unsafety." By allowing these types of vulnerabilities, languages such as C and C++ have facilitated a nearly unending stream of critical computer security vulnerabilities for years. Imagine you had a program with a list of 10 numbers. What should happen if you asked the list for its 11th element? Most of us would say an error of some sort should occur, and in a memory safe programming language (for example, Python or Java) that's what would happen. In a memory unsafe programming language, it'll look at wherever in memory the 11th element would be (if it existed) and try to access it. Sometimes this will result in a crash, but in many cases you get whatever happens to be at that location in memory, even if that portion of memory has nothing to do with our list. This type of vulnerability is called a "buffer-overflow," and it's one of the most common types of memory unsafety vulnerabilities. HeartBleed, which impacted 17 percent of the secure web servers on the internet, was a buffer-overflow exploit, letting you read 60 kilobytes past the end of a list, including passwords and[..]

Dell sweetens VMware tracking stock offer with higher price, board seat

(6 days ago)
Dell Technologies on Thursday raised its offer to buy back shares tied to its interest in software maker VMware to $120 per share, sweetening the deal for shareholders with an additional $5 billion in cash.

How Podcasts Became a Seductive -- and Sometimes Slippery -- Mode of Storytelling

(6 days ago)
An anonymous reader shares a report: Podcasting has offered advertisers a new means of reaching demographically targeted consumers. Many podcasts feature extended endorsements, read by the host, that often include a discount code for a product or service. For listeners accustomed to a separation between advertising and editorial, the blurring of lines can be disconcerting (or embarrassing, such as when podcast hosts like Joe Rogan and Tim Ferriss expound on how much they enjoy wearing Me Undies). For advertisers that have spent heavily on podcasts, like the omnipresent Casper and Blue Apron, the effectiveness of such campaigns can be measured in increased sales. A representative for Blue Apron, which has launched its own branded podcast, "Why We Eat What We Eat," in addition to advertising on hundreds of shows, told me, "We view podcasts less as an advertising channel and more as a content channel to win new customers and engage existing customers." Podcast advertising remains a relatively new science. Producers and advertisers can instantly tabulate how many times a show has been downloaded, but it's harder to ascertain how many people have listened to the whole thing. A commercial marketplace puts pressure on podcasters to create content that can attract millions of listeners, which does not necessarily make for the strongest, or most subtle, content. Linsky, with some frustration, noted that it doesn't matter much to an advertiser if a podcast takes an hour to record or[..]

YouTube King PewDiePie Surrenders Crown To Indian Record Label T-Series

(6 days ago)
YouTube is about to crown a new king. T-Series, one of India's largest record labels, will become the most-subscribed channel on the world's most popular video site in the next couple weeks. At the beginning of the year, the company had 30 million fans, fewer than half of the following for No. 1 PewDiePie, the Swedish video-game geek and jokester whose real name is Felix Kjellberg. From a report: The company's ascent has shocked the tight-knit community of online personalities, prompting some to rally behind PewDiePie and delay T-Series' ascent. While claiming the most subscribers on YouTube is largely a symbolic achievement, and the company already has the most monthly views, the end of PewDiePie's five-year reign is a watershed moment that reflects important changes as internet use gets more global. More than half of the 10 most popular channels on YouTube in terms of monthly views are from outside the U.S., and many of them belong to professional media companies. YouTube's previous champions have been young, male amateurs like the video blogger Ray William Johnson and comedy duo Smosh. But after years as a mostly Western site for pranks and cat clips, the Google-owned company has lured most of the world's largest media giants to the site, blurring the line between professional and amateur. Further reading: Who Rules YouTube? Swift? Bieber? Nope. It's T-Series, a Record Label in India.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chinese Telecoms Giant ZTE is Helping Venezuela Build a System That Monitors Citizen Behavior Through a New Identification Card

(6 days ago)
The "fatherland card," already used by the government to track voting, worries many in Venezuela and beyond. From a report: In April 2008, former Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez dispatched Justice Ministry officials to visit counterparts in the Chinese technology hub of Shenzhen. Their mission, according to a member of the Venezuela delegation, was to learn the workings of China's national identity card program. Chavez, a decade into his self-styled socialist revolution, wanted help to provide ID credentials to the millions of Venezuelans who still lacked basic documentation needed for tasks like voting or opening a bank account. Once in Shenzhen, though, the Venezuelans realized a card could do far more than just identify the recipient. There, at the headquarters of Chinese telecom giant ZTE Corp, they learned how China, using smart cards, was developing a system that would help Beijing track social, political and economic behavior. Using vast databases to store information gathered with the card's use, a government could monitor everything from a citizen's personal finances to medical history and voting activity. "What we saw in China changed everything," said the member of the Venezuelan delegation, technical advisor Anthony Daquin. His initial amazement, he said, gradually turned to fear that such a system could lead to abuses of privacy by Venezuela's government. "They were looking to have citizen control." The following year, when he raised concerns with Venezuelan[..]

France hopes to lure crypto-issuers with Gallic stamp of approval

(6 days ago)
With hundreds of cryptocurrencies being issued every month, countries face a choice: ban them, leave them unregulated, or come up with rules to tame them.

Playing catch-up, Germany throws money at AI

(6 days ago)
Germany plans to invest more than 3 billion euros ($3.39 million) by 2025 to beef up its artificial intelligence capabilities and appoint 100 professors to lecture about it, as it seeks to close a digital technology gap with other leading economies.

Minister in Charge of Japan's Cybersecurity Says He Has Never Used a Computer

(6 days ago)
Futurepower(R) shares a report: A lot of people don't use computers. Most of them aren't in charge of a nation's cybersecurity. But one is. Japanese lawmakers were aghast on Wednesday when Yoshitaka Sakurada, 68, the minister who heads the government's cybersecurity office, said during questioning in Parliament that he had no need for the devices, and appeared confused when asked basic technology questions. "I have been independently running my own business since I was 25 years old," he said. When computer use is necessary, he said, "I order my employees or secretaries" to do it. [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; alternative source.] "I don't type on a computer," he added. Asked by a lawmaker if nuclear power plants allowed the use of USB drives, a common technology widely considered to be a security risk, Mr. Sakurada did not seem to understand what they were. "I don't know details well," he said. "So how about having an expert answer your question if necessary, how's that?" The comments were immediately criticized. "I can't believe that a person who never used a computer is in charge of cybersecurity measures," said Masato Imai, an opposition lawmaker.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Dell sweetens VMware offer with higher price, board seat

(6 days ago)
Dell Technologies on Thursday raised its offer to buy back shares tied to its interest in software maker VMware to $120 per share, still way short of the $300 price suggested by activist investor Carl Icahn.

Dell raises VMWare tracking stock offer to $120 per share

(6 days ago)
Dell Technologies on Thursday raised its offer to buy back shares tied to its interest in software maker VMWare to $120 per share from its previous offer of $109, still way short of the $300 price suggested by activist investor Carl Icahn.

Apple supplier AMS cuts forecast, indicating poor iPhone demand

(6 days ago)
Austria's AMS , which makes facial recognition technology, became the latest Apple supplier to cut its revenue forecast, adding to growing evidence that the latest iPhones are not selling well.

Liberty Global 'not desperate' to sell Swiss business: CFO

(6 days ago)
Cable operator Liberty Global is investing to strengthen its Swiss UPC video offering so it could stand alone if a strategic partner isn't found, CFO Charlie Bracken said on Thursday.

Ford CEO open to investors in autonomous vehicles but cautious on VW

(6 days ago)
Ford Motor Co Chief Executive Jim Hackett told Reuters the automaker is open to investment by automakers and others in its autonomous vehicle business, but cautioned that expanding partnerships with German automaker Volkswagen AG is a "delicate dance."

Airspace Technologies raises $20 million as investors pile into logistics startups

(6 days ago)
The latest startup aiming to bring new technology to the business of moving around cargo has raised $20 million in fresh funding, bolstering an already record year of fundraising for companies in the shipping and logistics sector.

Mark Zuckerberg Reportedly Ordered All Facebook Executives To Use Android Phones After Tim Cook Criticized Facebook

(6 days ago)
A new report from the New York Times sheds some light on what happened inside Facebook last year as the company was fighting numerous scandals, including Russian interference and the Cambridge Analytica scandal in March. In addition to reportedly hiring a public relations firm to write dozens of articles critical of rivals Google and Apple, the social media company ordered Facebook executives to use Android phones, after Apple CEO Tim Cook criticized the company in an MSNBC interview for being a service that traffics "in your personal life." According to the report, the order came from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The Verge reports: In those comments made back in March, Cook dismissed a question asking him what he would do if he were in Zuckerberg's shoes dealing with the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica scandal by saying, "I wouldn't be in this situation." Zuckerberg soon after retorted in an interview with Recode that he found Cook's comments to be "extremely glib," and that "I think it's important that we don't all get Stockholm syndrome and let the companies that work hard to charge you more convince you that they actually care more about you. Because that sounds ridiculous to me." While it's not clear how Cook's aggressive comments directly provoked Zuckerberg into issuing his Android-only order, it's still a rational decision to make Americans use Android. Android is the dominant operating system in many regions outside of the U.S., including South America,[..]

Esports Awards: Ninja 'blessed' to pick up two awards

(6 days ago)
The streamer says he feels "blessed and honoured" after winning personality and streamer of the year.

Are hydrogen trains the future of UK travel?

(6 days ago)
Trains that emit pure water could be in the UK by the "early 2020s", according to the government.

Mitsubishi windows shine 'alarmingly realistic' fake sunlight

(6 days ago)
Mitsubishi has developed a new indoor lighting system that mimics blue skies, sunrises and sunsets.

How the humble lamp-post could help power our cities

(6 days ago)
As more of half of us live in cities, scientists are looking at new ways of harnessing urban energy.

How can we stop being cyber idiots?

(6 days ago)
Good computer security means working around one big security flaw - us.

Should Fortnite credit dances used in the game?

(6 days ago)
Epic Games has been criticised for not crediting the originators of dance moves depicted in Fortnite.

How US employers silence sex accusers

(6 days ago)
Many employees are legally barred from suing their employers, as the Google case illustrates.

Why robots will build the cities of the future

(6 days ago)
As construction workforces age, we are likely to turn to robots to build the cities of the future.

Robot delivers the post and other technology news

(6 days ago)
BBC Click’s Lara Lewington looks at some of the best technology news stories of the week.

The robot arm made for gentle undersea exploration

(6 days ago)
A soft robotic arm which will allow underwater sea life to be studied in greater detail is created.

Will superfast 5G mobile be worth it?

(6 days ago)
Superfast 5G mobile promises lots of benefits, but will it be worth the money?

Online security and privacy: What an email address reveals

(6 days ago)
A think tank researcher explains how political campaigners can use information gleaned from an online search.

Parents 'need to put their phones in a box', MPs told

(6 days ago)
MPs are told that parents should act as role models for children by putting their phones down.

Mozilla's 'Privacy Not Included' Gift Report Highlights Security Concerns

(6 days ago)
Mozilla has released its second annual "Privacy Not Included" guide that rates 70 products to help give you an idea as to how secure or insecure they are. "We want to provide people information about how to make informed decisions when shopping for gifts that are connected to the internet," says Ashley Boyd, vice president of advocacy at Mozilla. "These products are becoming really popular. And in some cases, it's easy to forget that they're even connected to the internet." Wired reports: Among the important signifiers of a trustworthy stocking stuffer, according to Mozilla's rubric: the use of encryption, pushing automatic software security updates, strong password hygiene, a way to deal with vulnerabilities should they arise, and a privacy policy that doesn't take a PhD to parse. The most surprising result of Mozilla's testing may be how many products actually earned its seal of approval. Thirty-three of the 70 items in the "Privacy Not Included" guide passed muster; fans of the Nintendo Switch, Google Home, and Harry Potter Kano Coding Kit can sleep a little easier. On the other end of the scale, Mozilla highlighted seven products that may not hit the mark -- yes, including the sous vide wand, the Anova Precision Cooker. Also scoring low marks in Mozilla's accounting: the DJI Spark Selfie Drone (no encryption, does not require users to change the default password), the Parrot Bebop 2 drone (no encryption, complex privacy policy), and unsurprisingly, at least one baby[..]
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