Technology News

The Cost For Each SLS Launch Is Over $2 Billion

(5 days ago)
Acting director of the White House budget office Russell Vought said in a letter that the cost estimate to build and fly a single NASA large Space Launch System rocket in a given year is "more than $2 billion." "The article then notes how this cost is affecting the Europa Clipper mission, which has three launch options, with SLS mandated by Congress," writes Slashdot reader schwit1. From the report: The powerful SLS booster offers the quickest ride for the six-ton spacecraft to Jupiter, less than three years. But for mission planners, there are multiple concerns about this rocket beyond just its extraordinary cost. There is the looming threat that the program may eventually be canceled (due to its cost and the emergence of significantly lower cost, privately built rockets). NASA's human exploration program also has priority on using the SLS rocket, so if there are manufacturing issues, a science mission might be pushed aside. Finally, there is the possibility of further developmental delays -- significant ground testing of SLS has yet to begin.Another option is United Launch Alliance's Delta IV Heavy rocket, which has an excellent safety record and has launched several high-profile missions for NASA. However, this rocket requires multiple gravity assists to push the Clipper into a Jupiter orbit, including a Venus flyby. This heating would add additional thermal constraints to the mission, and scientists would prefer to avoid this if at all possible. A final possibility is[..]

Sea Levels Will Rise For Centuries Even If Greenhouse Gas Emissions Goals Are Me

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Weather Channel: Sea levels will continue to rise for the next three centuries even if governments meet carbon emissions pledges for 2030 set in the Paris climate agreement, a new study indicates. Greenhouse gas emissions from 2016 to 2030 alone would cause sea levels to increase nearly 8 inches (20 cm) by 2300, research led by Climate Analytics and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research showed. And that doesn't take into account the effects of already irreversible melting of the Antarctic ice sheet, according to a news release about the study. "Our results show that what we do today will have a huge effect in 2300. Twenty centimeters is very significant; it is basically as much sea-level rise as we've observed over the entire 20th century. To cause that with only 15 years of emissions is quite staggering," said Climate Analytics' Alexander Nauels, lead author of the study. The 8-inch increase is one-fifth of the nearly 40-inch total rise in sea levels expected by 2300, according to the study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. More than half of the 8-inch increase can be attributed to emissions from the world's top five polluters: China, the United States, the European Union, India and Russia, the study found. "Only stringent near-term emission reductions" aimed at preventing global temperatures from rising more than the Paris agreement goal would provide a chance of limiting long-term sea[..]

AT&T Switches Customers To More Expensive Plans Without Asking Them First

(5 days ago)
AT&T is adding $10 to the monthly bills of customers with certain grandfathered mobile-data plans and not letting them switch back to their older packages. AT&T is pitching the change as a "bonus" because it's also adding 15GB to the customers' monthly data allotments. Ars Technica reports: "Enjoy more data," AT&T says in a support document. "Starting with your October 2019 bill, you'll get an additional 15GB of data on your Mobile Share plan. This bonus data comes with a $10 price increase." Paying an extra $10 for another 15GB isn't a bad deal as far as U.S. wireless prices go, but that's only true if you actually need the extra data. The plans getting the data-and-price increases already had between 20GB and 60GB of data per month at prices that ranged from $100 to $225. Now those plans have 35GB to 75GB and cost $110 to $235. (The data allotments can be shared among multiple people on the same family plan.) These Mobile Share Value plans were introduced in December 2013 and are apparently no longer offered to new customers. This is at least the second time this year that AT&T has added $10 and extra data to customer bills; a previous increase took effect between March and May and mostly affected a different set of Mobile Share Value plans, according to another AT&T support document. AT&T confirmed that there's no way to opt out of the new $10 increase, The Verge reported yesterday.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

California Wildfires Spark Interest In DIY Home Protection

(5 days ago)
As California struggles through a wildfire season that has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee and burned hundreds of homes, researchers are seeking ways to protect buildings including by wrapping them in "fire blankets." Reuters reports: Last month, Fumiaki Takahashi, a professor at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, published the findings of 10 years of research on the potential for sheets of fire-resistant material to preserve homes. The blankets work but only in certain conditions, he said. "Each fire is different and each house is different," he noted. The blankets can withstand intensive fire exposure for little more than 10 minutes and take hours or days to apply. Dan Hirning, CEO of California-based FireZat Inc, which supplies fire "shields" made from one of the materials tested by Takahashi, said people could wrap their homes in the blankets independent of fire officials. Applying a fire blanket to an average home would take four to five hours, with four people working on it, he noted. One reusable roll of FireZat's material can cover 1,500 square feet (about 140 square meters) and costs close to $900. The shields are made of a flexible aluminum sheet and a fiberglass backing held together by an acrylic adhesive to form a fire barrier built to withstand heat of up to 550 degrees Celsius (1,022 degrees Fahrenheit). The National Fire Protection Association's "Firewise" program can also help communities by helping people stop fire from spreading to[..]

WhatsApp adds shopping catalog feature, courting e-commerce

(5 days ago)
Facebook Inc on Thursday launched a catalog feature for its WhatsApp messaging app, it said in a blog post, building out the service's e-commerce tools as it moves slowly toward monetizing the app it bought in 2014 for $19 billion.

Microsoft's Rust Experiments Are Going Well, But Some Features Are Missing

(5 days ago)
Microsoft gave a status update today on its experiments on using the Rust programming language instead of C and C++ to write Windows components. From a report: Microsoft began experimenting with Rust over the summer. The Redmond-based software giant said it was interested in Rust because, over the past decade, more than 70% of the security patches it shipped out fixed memory-related bugs, an issue that Rust was created to address. [...] Today, almost four months later, we got the first feedback. "I've been tasked with an experimental rewrite of a low-level system component of the Windows codebase (sorry, we can't say which one yet)," said Adam Burch, Software Engineer at the Microsoft Hyper-V team, in a blog post today. "Though the project is not yet finished, I can say that my experience with Rust has been generally positive," Burch added. "In general, new components or existing components with clean interfaces will be the easiest to port to Rust," the Microsoft engineer said. However, not all things went smoothly. It would have been unrealistic if we expected they would. Burch cited the lack of safe transmutation, safe support for C style unions, fallible allocation, and a lack of support for at-scale unit testing, needed for Microsoft's sprawling code-testing infrastructure.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chrome OS 78 Rolling Out With Picture-In-Picture Support For YouTube, Split Browser/Device Settings, More

(5 days ago)
The latest version of Chrome OS, version 78, adds separate browser and device settings, click-to-call, and picture-in-picture support for YouTube. It also introduces virtual desktop support for the operating system with a feature called Virtual Desks. 9to5Google reports: Chrome is getting another cross-device sharing feature after "Send this page" widely rolled in September. With "click-to-call," you can right-click on phone number links -- like tel:800-800-8000 -- to have them sent to your Android device. It's quicker than manually entering those digits or transferring via email. Chrome OS 78 will separate browser and device settings. The former is accessible directly at chrome://settings and what opens when clicking "Settings" at the bottom of the Overflow menu in the top-right corner of any browser window. It opens as a tab and provides web-related preferences. Meanwhile, chrome://os-settings opens as its own window, and can be accessed from the quick settings sheet. It provides device options like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Assistant in a white Material Theme UI with an icon in the launcher/app shelf. YouTube for Android now supports picture-in-picture with Chrome OS 78. After starting a video in the mobile client, switching to another window, covering, or minimizing the app will automatically open a PiP in the bottom-right corner. Available controls include switching to audio, play/pause, and skipping to the next track. In the top-left, you can expand the window and a[..]

Mysterious Hacker Dumps Database of Infamous IronMarch Neo-Nazi Forum

(5 days ago)
Freshly Exhumed shares a report from ZDNet: A mysterious hacker has published today a database dump of one of the internet's most infamous neo-nazi meeting places -- the IronMarch forum. The data published today includes a full copy of its content, including sensitive details such as emails, IP addresses, usernames, and private messages. The database dump is currently being analyzed by a multitude of entities, including law enforcement, in the hopes of linking forum members to accounts on other sites and potentially exposing their real-world identities. The drive to unmask forum members comes from the fact that IronMarch, while a little-known site to most internet users, has been the birthplace of two of today's most extreme far-right neo-nazi movements -- the Atomwaffen Division and SIEGE Culture -- with the first being accused of orchestrating at least eight murders around the world. The forum's data was published earlier today via the Internet Archive portal. "The published information includes a carbon copy of the site, from user details to forum posts, and from private messages to multi-factor authentication settings and forum management logs," reports BleepingComputer. "The forum's database includes details on 3,548 registered profiles. The last user's database ID is 15,218; however, the dump only included details on 3,548 accounts -- most likely due to spam or deleted profiles. The registration date for the last user is November 20, 2017, suggesting the database is a[..]

Facebook fights disclosing app records in Massachusetts privacy probe

(5 days ago)
Facebook Inc on Thursday urged a judge not to force it to turn over records to Massachusetts' attorney general disclosing thousands of apps the social media giant suspects misused users' data, as part of a probe into its privacy practices.

DHS Will Soon Have Biometric Data On Nearly 260 Million People

(5 days ago)
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) expects to have face, fingerprint, and iris scans of at least 259 million people in its biometrics database by 2022, according to a recent presentation from the agency's Office of Procurement Operations reviewed by Quartz. From the report: That's about 40 million more than the agency's 2017 projections, which estimated 220 million unique identities by 2022, according to previous figures cited by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a San Francisco-based privacy rights nonprofit. A slide deck, shared with attendees at an Oct. 30 DHS industry day, includes a breakdown of what its systems currently contain, as well as an estimate of what the next few years will bring. The agency is transitioning from a legacy system called IDENT to a cloud-based system (hosted by Amazon Web Services) known as Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology, or HART. The biometrics collection maintained by DHS is the world's second-largest, behind only India's countrywide biometric ID network in size. The traveler data kept by DHS is shared with other U.S. agencies, state and local law enforcement, as well as foreign governments.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook fights disclosing app records in Massachusetts privacy probe

(5 days ago)
Facebook Inc on Thursday urged a judge not to force it to turn over records to Massachusetts' attorney general disclosing thousands of apps the social media giant suspects misused users' data, as part of a probe into its privacy practices.

Take-Two's holiday sales forecast overshadows quarterly beat

(5 days ago)
Videogame publisher Take-Two Interactive Software Inc forecast holiday-quarter revenue below expectations, as console-based titles face stiff competition from online free-to-play games that attract a more younger audience.

Ahead of Merger, T-Mobile Announces Its Cheapest Phone Plan Ever and 5G Coming December 6th

(5 days ago)
The T-Mobile and Sprint merger hasn't been officially completed yet, but that hasn't stopped the "Un-carrier" from talking about what it will do with its newfound resources. T-Mobile announced today that it plans to launch the company's cheapest phone plan ever and roll out its 5G network starting December 6th. Gizmodo reports: Starting at just $15 a month, the new T-Mobile Connect plan offers unlimited talk and text plus 2GB of 4G or 5G data. Now admittedly, 2GB of data per month isn't all that much, but considering the T-Mobile's current least expensive plans start at $30 a month (and that's including a discount for having four lines), T-Mobile Connect could provide some much-needed savings for low-income families -- at least temporarily while it gathers all the goodwill it can muster in the merger process. Additionally, T-Mobile also teased two other new programs with its Connecting Heroes Initiative, which promises to give unlimited talk, text and 5G access to every first responder in the U.S. for the next 10 years. This includes public and non-profit fire, police, and EMS personnel. Then there's T-Mobile's Project 10 Million, which promises to handout 10 million hotspots to students across the country that will provide up to 100GB of free mobile data per year. With Project 10 Million, T-Mobile is hoping to give children and students greater access to broadband internet in order to make completing homework just a bit easier. Also, next month T-Mobile says it will turn on[..]

GoPro quarterly revenue beats on 'Hero' camera demand, shares rise

(5 days ago)
GoPro Inc beat analysts' estimates for third-quarter revenue on Thursday, boosted by demand for its new Hero camera, sending its shares up 11% in after-market trading.

Amazon Ring Doorbells Exposed Home Wi-Fi Passwords To Hackers

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Security researchers have discovered a vulnerability in Ring doorbells that exposed the passwords for the Wi-Fi networks to which they were connected. Bitdefender said the Amazon-owned doorbell was sending owners' Wi-Fi passwords in cleartext as the doorbell joins the local network, allowing nearby hackers to intercept the Wi-Fi password and gain access to the network to launch larger attacks or conduct surveillance. "When first configuring the device, the smartphone app must send the wireless network credentials. This takes place in an unsecure manner, through an unprotected access point," said Bitdefender. "Once this network is up, the app connects to it automatically, queries the device, then sends the credentials to the local network." But all of this is carried out over an unencrypted connection, exposing the Wi-Fi password that is sent over the air. Amazon fixed the vulnerability in all Ring devices in September, but the vulnerability was only disclosed today.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Dropbox tops revenue, profit estimates on higher subscriber additions

(5 days ago)
Dropbox Inc beat analysts' estimates for third-quarter revenue and profit on Thursday, as the online file hosting company signed up more individual and business customers to its platform.

Take-Two's holiday sales forecast hit by rising competition

(5 days ago)
Videogame publisher Take-Two Interactive Software Inc forecast holiday-quarter revenue below expectations, as console-based titles face stiff competition from online free-to-play games such as "PUBG" and "Fortnite".

Activision forecasts fourth-quarter adjusted revenue below estimates

(5 days ago)
Activision Blizzard Inc forecast fourth-quarter adjusted revenue below estimates, as the video game publisher faces stiff competition from online, free-to-play games.

Google-Funded Library Programs Teaching Google-Provided Curricula

(5 days ago)
theodp writes: Q. What's the difference between Andrew Carnegie and Google? A. Andrew Carnegie used his wealth to help build libraries, while Google's using its wealth to get libraries to help build its brands. "In advance of Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek)," announced the American Library Association (ALA), "an annual event to get students excited about coding, ALA will be awarding $300 mini-grants to school and public libraries that facilitate a program for youth during Computer Science Education Week, December 9-15, 2019, using Google's CS First Hour of Code activity. This year, youth can use their imagination to turn a real-life hero into a superhero using code. Code Your Hero is an activity that honors the everyday heroes in our students' lives who use their powers to better their communities. Libraries Ready to Code is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) and sponsored by Google, which aims to ensure libraries have the resources, capacity, and inspiration to embrace activities that promote computational thinking (CT) and coding among our nation's youth." Last month, the ALA announced it had received a $2 million Google.org grant to develop library entrepreneurship centers. In advance of last December's CSEdWeek, Google announced a $1 million sponsorship to the ALA, creating a pool of micro-funds that local libraries could access to bring digital skills training to their community in conjunction with the Libraries Lead with Digital Skills[..]

GM sells shuttered Ohio plant to EV truck start-up

(5 days ago)
General Motors Co confirmed on Thursday it has sold its shuttered Lordstown Assembly plant in Ohio to a start-up that has an ambitious plan to begin building electric pick-up trucks by the end of 2020.

Older Samsung Smart TVs, Certain Roku Devices To Lose Netflix Support Next Month

(5 days ago)
An unspecified number of smart TVs manufactured by Samsung will lose native support for Netflix next month, the companies said in an announcement this week. From a report: Netflix app installed -- or available for -- Samsung smart TVs manufactured in 2010 and 2011 (C and D lineups) -- and likely sold for many years after that -- will stop functioning December 2, Samsung alerted customers this week. In a statement, a company spokesperson said these TV models were sold only in the U.S. and Canada. In its statement, the top smart TV manufacturer advised affected customers to look for a game console, streaming media player, set-top box or other devices that still support Netflix app to continue their binge-watching sessions. A Netflix spokesperson cited technical limitations for the change. The developement comes weeks after Netflix alerted several Roku customers that they, too, will lose access to the streaming service on December 1.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

French government seeks to comb social media to fight tax fraud

(5 days ago)
France's government is seeking to give the authorities the power to trawl social media for signs of tax avoidance and fraud, according to a provision of the budget 2020 draft law that is being debated in parliament.

OpenAI Has Published the Text-Generating AI it Said Was Too Dangerous To Share

(5 days ago)
The research lab OpenAI has released the full version of a text-generating AI system that experts warned could be used for malicious purposes. From a report: The institute originally announced the system, GPT-2, in February this year, but withheld the full version of the program out of fear it would be used to spread fake news, spam, and disinformation. Since then it's released smaller, less complex versions of GPT-2 and studied their reception. Others also replicated the work. In a blog post this week, OpenAI now says it's seen "no strong evidence of misuse" and has released the model in full. GPT-2 is part of a new breed of text-generation systems that have impressed experts with their ability to generate coherent text from minimal prompts. The system was trained on eight million text documents scraped from the web and responds to text snippets supplied by users. Feed it a fake headline, for example, and it will write a news story; give it the first line of a poem and it'll supply a whole verse. It's tricky to convey exactly how good GPT-2's output is, but the model frequently produces eerily cogent writing that can often give the appearance of intelligence (though that's not to say what GPT-2 is doing involves anything we'd recognize as cognition).Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook says doctored UK election clip wouldn't break its ad rules

(5 days ago)
Facebook said on Thursday that a doctored video shared by Britain's governing Conservatives would not have broken its rules on political advertising if it had run as a paid-for ad, and suggested the video had enriched public debate.

Facebook says doctored UK election clip wouldn't break its ad rules

(5 days ago)
Facebook said on Thursday that a doctored video shared by Britain's governing Conservatives would not have broken its rules on political advertising if it had run as a paid-for ad, and suggested the video had enriched public debate.

SoftBank-backed Banco Inter launches app linking clients to stores

(6 days ago)
Brazilian mid-sized lender Banco Inter SA on Thursday launched a smartphone app offering clients direct access to more than 60 stores selling products from appliances to sneakers to beauty products.

U.S. charges New York company with illegal Chinese equipment sales

(6 days ago)
Federal prosecutors have filed criminal charges accusing a New York company of exposing the U.S. government and private customers to security risks by illegally importing and selling surveillance and security equipment from China.

A Ton of People Received Text Messages Overnight That Were Originally Sent on Valentine's Day

(6 days ago)
Something strange is happening with text messages in the US right now. Overnight, a multitude of people received text messages that appear to have originally been sent on or around Valentine's Day 2019. From a report: These people never received the text messages in the first place; the people who sent the messages had no idea that they had never been received, and they did nothing to attempt to resend them overnight. Delayed messages were sent from and received by both iPhones and Android phones, and the messages seem to have been sent and received across all major carriers in the US. Many of the complaints involve T-Mobile or Sprint, although AT&T and Verizon have been mentioned as well. People using regional US carriers, carriers in Canada, and even Google Voice also seem to have experienced delays. At fault seems to be a system that multiple cell carriers use for messaging. A Sprint spokesperson said a "maintenance update" last night caused the error.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The July Galileo Outage: What Happened and Why

(6 days ago)
New submitter Myself writes: There's a funny thing about a global satellite system that beams signals down to anyone to use: It also means anyone can monitor the performance thereof. So when such a system suffers a crippling days-long outage and the operators are tight-lipped about why, look no further than Bert Hubert (who you may know from the PowerDNS project) to scramble together a bunch of code and a worldwide network of volunteers, to analyze exactly what happened. This is the story of how and why the Galileo GNSS network was down for a whole week.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Apple Services Censored in China Where Devices Flourished

(6 days ago)
When it comes to many of Apple's latest services, iPhone users in China are missing out. From a report: Podcast choices are paltry. Apple TV+ is off the air. News subscriptions are blocked, and Arcade gaming is nowhere to be found. For years, Apple made huge inroads in the world's most populous nation with hardware that boasted crisp displays, sleek lines and speedy processors. It peddled little of the content that boxed U.S. internet giants Google and Facebook out of the country. But now that Apple is becoming a major digital services provider, it's struggling to avoid the fate of its rivals. Apple services such as the App Store, digital books, news, video, podcasts and music, put the company in the more precarious position of information provider (or at least overseer), exposing it to a growing online crackdown by China's authoritarian government. While standard iPhone services like iMessage work in China, many paid offerings that help Apple generate recurring revenue from its devices aren't available in the country. That includes four new services that Apple announced this year: TV+ video streaming, the Apple Card, Apple Arcade and the News+ subscription. Other well-known Apple services can't be accessed in the country either, including the iTunes Store, iTunes Movie rentals, Apple Books and the Apple TV and Apple News apps. Over the past year, Apple's Weather app lost its ability to show air quality index, or AQI, data for Chinese cities -- regardless of the user's[..]

Florida risk helped ruin Uber for insurer James River

(6 days ago)
A Bermuda-based insurer that recently severed ties with an Uber Technologies Inc affiliate said on Thursday the risk of providing driver ride-hailing coverage had become too great and that it had mispriced policies during its initial years on the account.

Facebook Crypto Boss: 'I Don't Think of Bitcoin as a Currency'

(6 days ago)
David Marcus, the head of Facebook's cryptocurrency projects, says that Bitcoin is digital gold, but it's not a good currency for transactions. From a report: "I don't think of Bitcoin as a currency. It's actually not a great medium of exchange because of its volatility," Marcus said speaking at the New York Times DealBook Conference in New York. "I see it as digital gold." Marcus said Bitcoin is like gold because you can hold on to it as an investment just as people do with actual gold, but the drastic upswings and dips that Bitcoin goes through makes it a bad option for people who need a system to send remittances across borders. That is a key market that Facebook is targeting with its Libra cryptocurrency and Calibra digital wallet. Unlike Bitcoin, Libra's value will be tied to currencies like the U.S. dollar and the Euro, which will help it remain stable. Marcus said a key reason that Bitcoin has not been regulated out of existence is because it is not perceived to be a medium of exchange. "It's an investment class that's decorrelated from the rest of the market," Marcus said. "Why feel threatened by that?"Read more of this story at Slashdot.

After Google's Fitbit deal, EU says worrying when firms targeted for their data

(6 days ago)
The acquisition of companies for their data is concerning in general for regulators, Europe's antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager said on Thursday, a week after Google bought fitness trackers company Fitbit.

China's Didi reverses decision to allow late rides for men only

(6 days ago)
Chinese ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing, which plans to relaunch its carpool service suspended after a woman was murdered by her driver last year, reversed a decision on Thursday to allow late rides for male passengers only.

Microsoft's $3,500 HoloLens 2 Starts Shipping

(6 days ago)
Earlier this year at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Microsoft announced the second generation of its HoloLens augmented reality visor. Today, the $3,500 HoloLens 2 is going on sale in the United States, Japan, China, Germany, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Australia and New Zealand, the same countries where it was previously available for pre-order. From a report: Ahead of the launch, I got to spend some time with the latest model, after a brief demo in Barcelona earlier this year. Users will immediately notice the larger field of view, which still doesn't cover your full field of view, but offers a far better experience compared to the first version (where you often felt like you were looking at the virtual objects through a stamp-sized window). The team also greatly enhanced the overall feel of wearing the device. It's not light, at 1.3 pounds, but with the front visor that flips up and the new mounting system that is far more comfortable. In regular use, existing users will also immediately notice the new gestures for opening up the Start menu (this is Windows 10, after all). Instead of a 'bloom' gesture, which often resulted in false positives, you now simply tap on the palm of your hand, where a Microsoft logo now appears when you look at it.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chronicle, the Google Moonshot Cybersecurity Startup That Was Supposed To Completely Change the Industry, is Imploding

(6 days ago)
Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai and Joseph Cox, reporting for Motherboard: In early 2018, Google's parent conglomerate Alphabet announced the birth of a new "independent" startup that was supposed to revolutionize cybersecurity. Chronicle was meant to be a new type of startup. One of its products was designed to structure, organize, and help companies understand their security related data -- a "Google Photos for businesses' network security," as Forbes put it when the company announced its first product this year. The promise was radical: Chronicle would leverage machine learning and Alphabet's near-endless well of security telemetry data about known malware and internet infrastructure and use it to help security teams at companies detect intrusions that could threaten a company's network. Crucially, Chronicle would also remain independent from Google, according to Stephen Gillett, the startup's CEO. "We want to 10x the speed and impact of security teams' work by making it much easier, faster and more cost-effective for them to capture and analyze security signals that have previously been too difficult and expensive to find," Gillett wrote in a blog post announcing Chronicle. "We know this mission is going to take years, but we're committed to seeing it through." At the time it was unclear what Chronicle was going to be. But industry observers were excited for what they thought was going to be a significant disruptor in an industry that is full of relatively old technologies[..]

Tech investing pioneer Hutchins bets on blockchain

(6 days ago)
Blockchain-based payments could revolutionize finance in the same way that internet companies transformed information and communications starting in the 1990s, according to technology investment pioneer Glenn Hutchins.

British broadcasters join up for new BritBox streaming service

(6 days ago)
A streaming service created by British broadcasters ITV and the BBC and went live on Thursday, entering a market dominated by Netflix and Amazon with a 5.99 pound ($7.70) a month offer focused on domestic content.

British broadcasters join up for new BritBox streaming service

(6 days ago)
A streaming service created by British broadcasters ITV and the BBC and went live on Thursday, entering a market dominated by Netflix and Amazon with a 5.99 pound ($7.70) a month offer focused on domestic content.
Add a source
Share |
| 1 |2 |3 |4 |5 |6 |7 |8 |9 |10 |




T:0.4768