Technology News

Verizon.net 'Gets Out Of The Email Business'

(4 days ago)
"We have decided to close down our email business," Verizon has announced -- in a move which affects 4.5 million accounts. Slashdot reader tomservo84 writes:Strangely enough, I didn't find out about this from Verizon, itself, but SiriusXM, who sent me an email saying that since I have a Verizon.net email address on file, I'd have to update it because they were getting rid of their email service. I thought it was a bad phishing attempt at first... Network World reports that customers are being notified "on a rolling basis... Once customers are notified, they are presented with a personal take-action date that is 30 days from the original notification." But even after that date, verizon.net email addresses can be revived using AOL Mail. "Over the years we've realized that there are more capable email platforms out there," Verizon concedes. "Migration is going well," a Verizon spokesperson told Network World. "I don't have any stats to share, but customers seem to appreciate that they have several choices, including an option that keeps their Verizon.net email address intact." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Anbox Can Run Android Apps Natively On Linux (In A Container)

(4 days ago)
Slashdot user #1083, downwa, writes:Canonical engineer Simon Fels has publicly released an Alpha version of Anbox. Similar to the method employed for Android apps on ChromeOS, Anbox runs an entire Android system (7.1.1 at present) in an LXC container. Developed over the last year and a half, the software promises to seamlessly bring performant Android apps to the Linux desktop. After installing Anbox (based on Android 7.1.1) and starting Anbox Application Manager, ten apps are available: Calculator, Calendar, Clock, Contacts, Email, Files, Gallery, Music, Settings, and WebView. Apps run in separate resizeable windows. Additional apps (ARM-native binaries are excluded) can be installed via adb. Installation currently is only supported on a few Linux distributions able to install snaps. Contributions are welcome on Github. In a blog post Simon describes it as "a side project" that he's worked on for over a year and a half. "There were quite a few problems to solve on the way to a really working implementation but it is now in a state that it makes sense to share it with a wider audience." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Social media time out as French election reaches final stage

(4 days ago)
The final hours of many electoral campaigns are frantic affairs, dominated by last-minute pitches, late-breaking polls and massive social media campaigns aimed at drumming up turnout

Waymo Is Using Grand Theft Auto V To Help Teach Its Self-Driving Cars

(4 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes Bloomberg:In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix... Last year, scientists from Darmstadt University of Technology in Germany and Intel Labs developed a way to pull visual information from Grand Theft Auto V. Now some researchers are deriving algorithms from GTAV software that's been tweaked for use in the burgeoning self-driving sector. The latest in the franchise from publisher Rockstar Games Inc. is just about as good as reality, with 262 types of vehicles, more than 1,000 different unpredictable pedestrians and animals, 14 weather conditions and countless bridges, traffic signals, tunnels and intersections... The idea isn't that the highways and byways of the fictional city of Los Santos would ever be a substitute for bona fide asphalt. But the game "is the richest virtual environment that we could extract data from," said Alain Kornhauser, a Princeton University professor of operations research and financial engineering who advises the Princeton Autonomous Vehicle Engineering team. Waymo uses its simulators to create a confounding motoring situation for every variation engineers can think of: having three cars changing lanes at the same time at an assortment of speeds and directions, for instance. What's learned virtually is applied physically, and problems[..]

EU mulls legislation in the fight against online hate speech

(4 days ago)
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union is considering legislative measures to harmonize how online platforms like Facebook , Twitter and Google take down hate speech and incitement to violence, a draft document seen by Reuters shows.

After Ebola, Liberians slowly embrace mental health care

(4 days ago)
'I grieve so much:' After Ebola, Liberians slowly embrace mental health care

Facebook targets 30,000 fake France accounts before election

(4 days ago)
Facebook says it has targeted 30,000 fake accounts linked to France ahead of the country's presidential election, as part of a worldwide effort against misinformation

American describes ‘mass panic’ and ‘mayhem’ during Paris attack

(4 days ago)
The man stopped to buy a rose for his wife, which may have saved their lives.

Systemd-Free Devuan Announces Its First Stable Release Candidate 'Jessie' 1.0.0

(4 days ago)
Long-time reader jaromil writes: Devuan 1.0.0-RC is announced, following its beta 2 release last year. The Debian fork that spawned over systemd controversy is reaching stability and plans long-term support. Devuan deploys an innovative continuous integration setup: with fallback on Debian packages, it overlays its own modifications and then uses the merged source repository to ship images for 11 ARM targets, a desktop and minimal live, vagrant and qemu virtual machines and the classic installer isos. The release announcement contains several links to projects that have already adopted this distribution as a base OS. "Dear Init Freedom Lovers," begins the announcement, "Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you!" It points out that Devuan "can be adopted as a flawless upgrade path from both Debian Wheezy and Jessie. This is a main goal for the Devuan Jessie stable release and has proven to be a very stable operation every time it has been performed. " Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Russian hacker Roman Seleznev sentenced to 27 years for theft, sale of 2M+ CC numbers resulting in $170M+ in losses, the longest hacking-related sentence in US (Nicole Perlroth/New York Times)

(4 days ago)
Nicole Perlroth / New York Times:Russian hacker Roman Seleznev sentenced to 27 years for theft, sale of 2M+ CC numbers resulting in $170M+ in losses, the longest hacking-related sentence in US  —  Federal prosecutors have yet to capture or convict the foreign computer criminals believed to be behind the hackings of big retailers like Target and Neiman Marcus.

Trump Health Dept. dismisses Obama appointed surgeon general

(4 days ago)
The Trump administration has relieved Dr. Vivek Murthy of his duties as U.S. Surgeon General

Supply ship named for John Glenn arrives at space station

(4 days ago)
A supply ship bearing John Glenn's name has arrived at the International Space Station

Stack Overflow Reveals Which Programming Languages Are Most Used At Night

(4 days ago)
Stack Overflow data scientist David Robinson recently calculated when people visit the popular programming question-and-answer site, but then also calculated whether those results differed by programming language. Quoting his results: "C# programmers start and stop their day earlier, and tend to use the language less in the evenings. This might be because C# is often used at finance and enterprise software companies, which often start earlier and have rigid schedules.""C programmers start the day a bit later, keep using the language in the evening, and stay up the longest. This suggests C may be particularly popular among hobbyist programmers who code during their free time (or perhaps among summer school students doing homework).""Python and Javascript are somewhere in between: Python and Javascript developers start and end the day a little later than C# users, and are a little less likely than C programmers to work in the evening."The site also released an interactive app which lets users see how the results for other languages compared to C#, JavaScript, Python, and C, though of those four, "C# would count as the 'most nine-to-five,' and C as the least." And they've also calculated the technologies used most between 9 to 5 (which "include many Microsoft technologies, such as SQL Server, Excel, VBA, and Internet Explorer, as well as technologies like SVN and Oracle that are frequently used at enterprise software companies.") Meanwhile, the technologies most often used[..]

Lawyer: Abducted Tennessee girl's recovery 'just beginning'

(5 days ago)
A family lawyer says the "process of recovery is only just beginning" for a 15-year-old Tennessee student who was allegedly kidnapped by her teacher and taken to California

Can Parents Sue If Their Kid Is Born With the 'Wrong' DNA?

(5 days ago)
Long-time reader randomErr quotes Gizmodo:It's a nightmare scenario straight out of a primetime drama: a child-seeking couple visits a fertility clinic to try their luck with in-vitro fertilization, only to wind up accidentally impregnated by the wrong sperm. In a fascinating legal case out of Singapore, the country's Supreme Court ruled that this situation doesn't just constitute medical malpractice. The fertility clinic, the court recently ruled, must pay the parents 30% of upkeep costs for the child for a loss of 'genetic affinity.' In other words, the clinic must pay the parents' child support not only because they made a terrible medical mistake, but because the child didn't wind up with the right genes... "It's suggesting that the child itself has something wrong with it, genetically, and that it has monetary value attached to it," Todd Kuiken, a senior research scholar with the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University, told Gizmodo. "They attached damages to the genetic makeup of the child, rather than the mistake. That's the part that makes it uncomfortable. This can take you in all sort of fucked up directions." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Groq, a stealth startup founded by Google Tensor Processing Unit project engineers and Chamath Palihapitiya, has raised $10.3M (Ari Levy/CNBC)

(5 days ago)
Ari Levy / CNBC:Groq, a stealth startup founded by Google Tensor Processing Unit project engineers and Chamath Palihapitiya, has raised $10.3M  —  Google has slowly been pulling back the curtain on homegrown silicon that could define the future of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

Microsoft Will Support Python In SQL Server 2017

(5 days ago)
There was a surprise in the latest Community Technology Preview release of SQL Server 2017. An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld: Python can now be used within SQL Server to perform analytics, run machine learning models, or handle most any kind of data-powered work. This integration isn't limited to enterprise editions of SQL Server 2017, either -- it'll also be available in the free-to-use Express edition... Microsoft has also made it possible to embed Python code directly in SQL Server databases by including the code as a T-SQL stored procedure. This allows Python code to be deployed in production along with the data it'll be processing. These behaviors, and the RevoScalePy package, are essentially Python versions of features Microsoft built for SQL Server back when it integrated the R language into the database... An existing Python installation isn't required. During the setup process, SQL Server 2017 can pull down and install its own edition of CPython 3.5, the stock Python interpreter available from the Python.org website. Users can install their own Python packages as well or use Cython to generate C code from Python modules for additional speed. Except it's not yet available for Linux users, according to the article. "Microsoft has previously announced SQL Server would be available for Linux, but right now, only the Windows version of SQL Server 2017 supports Python."[..]

Supply ship named for John Glenn arrives at space station

(5 days ago)
A supply ship bearing John Glenn's name has arrived at the International Space Station

Harvard museum marking 150 years with new exhibit

(5 days ago)
A Harvard University museum is marking its 150th anniversary with a new exhibit showcasing its role developing the study of anthropology

WikiLeaks Releases New CIA Secret: Tapping Microphones On Some Samsung TVs

(5 days ago)
FossBytes reports:The whistleblower website Wikileaks has published another set of hacking tools belonging to the American intelligence agency CIA. The latest revelation includes a user guide for CIA's "Weeping Angel" tool... derived from another tool called "Extending" which belongs to UK's intelligence agency MI5/BTSS, according to Wikileaks. Extending takes control of Samsung F Series Smart TV. The highly detailed user guide describes it as an implant "designed to record audio from the built-in microphone and egress or store the data." According to the user guide, the malware can be deployed on a TV via a USB stick after configuring it on a Linux system. It is possible to transfer the recorded audio files through the USB stick or by setting up a WiFi hotspot near the TV. Also, a Live Liston Tool, running on a Windows OS, can be used to listen to audio exfiltration in real-time. Wikileaks mentioned that the two agencies, CIA and MI5/BTSS made collaborative efforts to create Weeping Angel during their Joint Development Workshops. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Latest: March for Science attracts thousands in Berlin

(5 days ago)
The March for Science has attracted several thousand people in Berlin, and those supporters of sciences have walked from one of the city's universities to the Brandenburg Gate

107 Cancer Papers Retracted Due To Peer Review Fraud

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The journal Tumor Biology is retracting 107 research papers after discovering that the authors faked the peer review process. This isn't the journal's first rodeo. Late last year, 58 papers were retracted from seven different journals -- 25 came from Tumor Biology for the same reason. It's possible to fake peer review because authors are often asked to suggest potential reviewers for their own papers. This is done because research subjects are often blindingly niche; a researcher working in a sub-sub-field may be more aware than the journal editor of who is best-placed to assess the work. But some journals go further and request, or allow, authors to submit the contact details of these potential reviewers. If the editor isn't aware of the potential for a scam, they then merrily send the requests for review out to fake e-mail addresses, often using the names of actual researchers. And at the other end of the fake e-mail address is someone who's in on the game and happy to send in a friendly review. This most recent avalanche of fake-reviewed papers was discovered because of extra screening at the journal. According to an official statement from Springer, the company that published Tumor Biology until this year, "the decision was made to screen new papers before they are released to production." The extra screening turned up the names of fake reviewers that hadn't previously been detected, and "in order to clean up our[..]

Scientists leave labs, take to streets to defend research

(5 days ago)
Thousands of scientists worldwide are making plans to leave their labs and take to the streets to rail against what they say are mounting attacks against science

Light Sail Propulsion Could Reach Sirius Sooner Than Alpha Centauri

(5 days ago)
RockDoctor writes: A recent proposition to launch probes to other star systems driven by lasers which remain in the Solar system has garnered considerable attention. But recently published work suggests that there are unexpected complexities to the system. One would think that the closest star systems would be the easiest to reach. But unless you are content with a fly-by examination of the star system, with much reduced science returns, you will need to decelerate the probe at the far end, without any infrastructure to assist with the braking. By combining both light-pressure braking and gravitational slingshots, a team of German, French and Chilean astronomers discover that the brightness of the destination star can significantly increase deceleration, and thus travel time (because higher flight velocities can be used). Slingshotting around a companion star to lengthen deceleration times can help shed flight velocity to allow capture into a stable orbit. The 4.37 light year distant binary stars Alpha Centauri A and B could be reached in 75 years from Earth. Covering the 0.24 light year distance to Proxima Centauri depends on arriving at the correct relative orientations of Alpha Centauri A and B in their mutual 80 year orbit for the sling shot to work. Without a companion star, Proxima Centauri can only absorb a final leg velocity of about 1280km/s, so that leg of the trip would take an additional 46 years. Using the same performance characteristics for the light sail, the[..]

EFF Says Google Chromebooks Are Still Spying On Students

(5 days ago)
schwit1 quotes a report from Softpedia: In the past two years since a formal complaint was made against Google, not much has changed in the way they handle this. Google still hasn't shed its "bad guy" clothes when it comes to the data it collects on underage students. In fact, the Electronic Frontier Foundation says the company continues to massively collect and store information on children without their consent or their parents'. Not even school administrators fully understand the extent of this operation, the EFF says. According to the latest status report from the EFF, Google is still up to no good, trying to eliminate students privacy without their parents notice or consent and "without a real choice to opt out." This, they say, is done via the Chromebooks Google is selling to schools across the United States. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IHS estimates Samsung's Galaxy S8, on sale starting at $720, costs $307.50 to make, $43.34 more than the it cost to manufacture the Galaxy S7 (Alexandra Vaidos/Softpedia News)

(5 days ago)
Alexandra Vaidos / Softpedia News:IHS estimates Samsung's Galaxy S8, on sale starting at $720, costs $307.50 to make, $43.34 more than the it cost to manufacture the Galaxy S7  —  The Galaxy S8 bill of materials reaches $301.60  —  Samsung's Galaxy S8 is more expensive than last year's Galaxy S7, because its internals have higher prices than its predecessor.

Britain Set For First Coal-Free Day Since Industrial Revolution

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The UK is set to have its first ever working day without coal power generation since the Industrial Revolution, according to the National Grid. The control room tweeted the predicted milestone on Friday, adding that it is also set to be the first 24-hour coal-free period in Britain. The UK has had shorter coal-free periods in 2016, as gas and renewables such as wind and solar play an increasing role in the power mix. The longest continuous period until now was 19 hours -- first achieved on a weekend last May, and matched on Thursday. Hannah Martin, head of energy at Greenpeace UK, said: "The first day without coal in Britain since the Industrial Revolution marks a watershed in the energy transition. A decade ago, a day without coal would have been unimaginable, and in 10 years' time our energy system will have radically transformed again." Britain became the first country to use coal for electricity when Thomas Edison opened the Holborn Viaduct power station in London in 1882. It was reported in the Observer at the time that "a hundred weight of coal properly used will yield 50 horse power for an hour." And that each horse power "will supply at least a light equivalent to 150 candles." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Waymo Says Uber Concealed A Secret Technology It Copied From Waymo From The Court (Caroline O'Donovan/BuzzFeed)

(5 days ago)
Caroline O'Donovan / BuzzFeed:Waymo Says Uber Concealed A Secret Technology It Copied From Waymo From The Court  —  An Uber self-driving Volvo drives in Pittsburgh Friday, March 17, 2017.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)  —  Waymo, Alphabet's autonomous car company, alleged in a court filing on Friday that Uber has been developing a secret …

All-Electric 'Flying Car' Takes Its First Test Flight In Germany

(5 days ago)
Today, Munich-based Lilium Aviation conducted the first test flight of its all-electric, two-seater, vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) prototype. "In a video provided by the Munich-based startup, the aircraft can be seen taking off vertically like a helicopter, and then accelerating into forward flight using wing-borne lift," reports The Verge. From the report: The craft is powered by 36 separate jet engines mounted on its 10-meter long wings via 12 movable flaps. At take-off, the flaps are pointed downwards to provide vertical lift. And once airborne, the flaps gradually tilt into a horizontal position, providing forward thrust. During the tests, the jet was piloted remotely, but its operators say their first manned flight is close-at-hand. And Lilium claims that its electric battery "consumes around 90 percent less energy than drone-style aircraft," enabling the aircraft to achieve a range of 300 kilometers (183 miles) with a maximum cruising speed of 300 kph (183 mph). "It's the same battery that you can find in any Tesla," Nathen told The Verge. "The concept is that we are lifting with our wings as soon as we progress into the air with velocity, which makes our airplane very efficient. Compared to other flights, we have extremely low power consumption." The plan is to eventually build a 5-passenger version of the jet.[..]

Developer of BrickerBot Malware Claims He Destroyed Over Two Million Devices

(5 days ago)
An anonymous reader writes: In an interview today, the author of BrickerBot, a malware that bricks IoT and networking devices, claimed he destroyed over 2 million devices, but he never intended to do so in the first place. His intentions were to fight the rising number of IoT botnets that were used to launch DDoS attacks last year, such as Gafgyt and Mirai. He says he created BrickerBot with 84 routines that try to secure devices so they can't be taken over by Mirai and other malware. Nevertheless, he realized that some devices are so badly designed that he could never protect them. He says that for these, he created a "Plan B," which meant deleting the device's storage, effectively bricking the device. His identity was revealed after a reporter received an anonymous tip about a HackForum users claiming he was destroying IoT devices since last November, just after BrickerBot appeared. When contacted, BrickerBot's author revealed that the malware is a personal project which he calls "Internet Chemotherapy" and he's "the doctor" who will kill all the cancerous unsecured IoT devices. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

KKR, INCJ plan joint bid for Toshiba's chip unit: Nikkei

(5 days ago)
(Reuters) - U.S. private equity firm KKR & Co LP and Japanese government-backed fund, Innovation Network Corp of Japan (INCJ), will submit a joint offer for Toshiba Corp's memory chip unit, the Nikkei business daily reported on Friday.

Singapore researchers turn water into 'virtual lemonade' but is it tart enough?

(5 days ago)
SINGAPORE (Reuters) - It looks like lemonade, tastes like lemonade, but it's simply water.

Indian techies, IT firms fret as Trump orders U.S. visa review

(5 days ago)
MUMBAI (Reuters) - For Grishma, an Indian software designer, President Donald Trump's review of the visa programme for bringing highly skilled workers into the United States comes at a bad time.

Sony lifts annual profit estimate on lower amortization costs

(5 days ago)
TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's Sony Corp raised its operating profit estimate for the year ended March 31 thanks to lower amortization costs for its financial services segment.

New global fund to raise $300 million for digital currency investments

(5 days ago)
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Alphabit, a global fund that invests in digital currencies, has been launched with a target of $300 million, co-founder Liam Robertson said in an interview, as managers seek to tap growing demand for virtual assets that allow for instant, borderless transactions.

China Mobile, others approached for buying into Singapore telco M1: sources

(5 days ago)
SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Top shareholders in Singapore telecoms company M1 Ltd have approached potential buyers China Mobile and global private equity firms, among others, to sell their combined majority stake in the firm, sources familiar with the matter said.

Cycling To Work Can Cut Cancer and Heart Disease

(5 days ago)
randomErr quotes a report from BBC: Want to live longer? Reduce your risk of cancer? And heart disease? Then cycle to work, say scientists. The five-year study of 250,000 UK commuters also showed walking had some benefits over sitting on public transport or taking the car. Published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) today, the University of Glasgow study compared those who had an "active" commute with those who were mostly stationary. Overall, 2,430 of those studied died, 3,748 were diagnosed with cancer and 1,110 had heart problems. But, during the course of the study, regular cycling cut the risk of death from any cause by 41%, the incidence of cancer by 45% and heart disease by 46%. The cyclists clocked an average of 30 miles per week, but the further they cycled the greater the health boon. However, the effect was still there even after adjusting the statistics to remove the effects of other potential explanations like smoking, diet or how heavy people are. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
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