Technology News

The $20B Plan To Power Singapore With Australian Solar

(3 hours ago)
The desert outside Tennant Creek, deep in the Northern Territory, is not the most obvious place to build and transmit Singapore's future electricity supply. Though few in the southern states are yet to take notice, a group of Australian developers are betting that will change. From a report: If they are right, it could have far-reaching consequences for Australia's energy industry and what the country sells to the world. Known as Sun Cable, it is promised to be the world's largest solar farm. If developed as planned, a 10-gigawatt-capacity array of panels will be spread across 15,000 hectares and be backed by battery storage to ensure it can supply power around the clock. Overhead transmission lines will send electricity to Darwin and plug into the NT grid. But the bulk would be exported via a high-voltage direct-current submarine cable snaking through the Indonesian archipelago to Singapore. The developers say it will be able to provide one-fifth of the island city-state's electricity needs, replacing its increasingly expensive gas-fired power. After 18 months in development, the $20bn Sun Cable development had a quiet coming out party in the Top End three weeks ago at a series of events held to highlight the NT's solar potential. The idea has been embraced by the NT government and attracted the attention of the software billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes, who is considering involvement through his Grok Ventures private investment firm. The NT plan follows a similarly[..]

Wirecard deal with AUTO1 first fruit of SoftBank alliance

(3 hours ago)
German payments company Wirecard AG said on Thursday it was teaming up with car-dealing platform AUTO1 Group to offer digital financial services to consumers, in its first alliance with a company backed by Japan's SoftBank Group.

Netflix shares plunge as global growth falls short, U.S. customers shrink

(3 hours ago)
Netflix Inc said on Wednesday it lost U.S. streaming customers for the first time in eight years and missed targets for new subscribers overseas, an announcement that jarred investors ahead of looming competition.

Delta, Alaska, and American Airlines Have All Been Sued Over Their Uniforms.

(3 hours ago)
Rashes, blisters, and hair loss have all been reported. So has vomiting, migraines, and shortness of breath. All of these -- and more -- are symptoms reported by flight attendants after their airlines got new uniforms. But no one knows why. From a report: Delta is the latest airline to have flight attendants report health issues possibly related to their uniforms, and employees at the airline filed a lawsuit in May against the manufacturer, Lands' End. But flight attendants have been battling health issues that have appeared after an airline instituted new uniforms for years. And for years, airlines have said their uniforms are safe. Meanwhile, flight attendants and others are working to discover the cause of their symptoms and the identity and total number of chemicals present in their uniforms, all of which can be difficult to ascertain. Until the cause can be identified -- or until airlines start listening to employees and moving quickly after their complaints -- it's likely employees will continue to face symptoms. And it's likely that flight attendants will keep heading to court, where they've historically needed to go to get policy changed by their employers. The problem was first reported after employees at Alaska Airlines got new uniforms toward the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Flight attendants began to report rashes and eye irritation, and documented hives, blisters, and scaly patches, according to a 2012 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health[..]

Online bank N26 extends latest funding round in expansion push

(3 hours ago)
Berlin-based N26 said on Thursday it raised an additional $170 million in its latest funding round, driving up its valuation to $3.5 billion, as the online bank looks to speed up expansion to markets outside Europe including the U.S.

MercadoLibre preps to offer investment platform for e-wallet users

(3 hours ago)
MercadoLibre Inc, Latin America's top e-commerce platform, is taking its latest step into the world of banking, saying on Wednesday that it would start allowing Mexican users of its e-wallet to earn interest on money saved in its app by year-end.

Data of 'nearly all adults' in Bulgaria stolen

(3 hours ago)
A hacker targeted the Balkan country's tax agency and reportedly offered local media access to stolen data.

Firefox To Warn When Saved Logins are Found in Data Breaches

(3 hours ago)
Starting in Firefox 70, Mozilla aims to have the browser report when any of your saved logins were found in data breaches. This will be done through their partnership with the Have I Been Pwned data breach site. From a report: Mozilla is slowly integrating their independent Firefox Monitor service and the new Firefox Lockwise password manager directly into Firefox. Mozilla is also considering premium services based around these features in the future. As part of this integration, Firefox will scan the saved login names and passwords and see if they were exposed in a data breach listed on Have I been Pwned. If one is found, Firefox will alert the user and prompt them to change their password. This new feature will only work, though, for data breaches that exposed passwords and when the password was saved prior to an associated data breach.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Wizard' cybersecurity expert charged with record hack of Bulgarian tax agency

(3 hours ago)
A 20-year-old Bulgarian cybersecurity worker has been arrested and charged with hacking the personal and financial records of millions of taxpayers, officials said on Wednesday, as police continue to investigate the country's biggest-ever data breach.

Google suspends ticket site Viagogo from advertising

(3 hours ago)
The move follows further legal action against the ticket resale website.

Amazon Faces Antitrust Probe In Europe Over Use of Merchant Data

(3 hours ago)
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Wall Street Journal: Amazon faces a formal European Union antitrust investigation (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source) into its dealings with merchants that sell goods on its site, marking an expansion of a multi-pronged regulatory push that has ensnared other U.S. tech giants like Facebook and Google. The European Commission, the EU's top antitrust enforcer, said Wednesday that its investigation will examine whether Amazon is abusing its dual role as a marketplace where independent sellers can offer products and as a retailer of products in its own right. In particular, the probe will study whether Amazon is using nonpublic data from independent merchants to compete unfairly against them. Investigators will also examine what data Amazon uses to pick a seller as the default option for a given product when a user clicks the "buy" button -- and whether Amazon has an unfair advantage to be designated the default for products it sells. The probe could eventually lead to formal charges, fines and orders for the company to change business practices, but it could also be dropped.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Japan to lead development of SWIFT network for cryptocurrency: source

(3 hours ago)
Japan's government is leading a global push to set up an international network for cryptocurrency payments, similar to the SWIFT network used by banks, in an effort to fight money laundering, a person familiar with the plan said on Thursday.

Amazon under EU antitrust fire over use of merchant data

(3 hours ago)
Amazon's use of merchants' data triggered an EU antitrust investigation on Wednesday, as regulatory concerns mount around the world on how tech giants exploit customer information to reinforce their market power.

'Cordless' Dyson fan advert falls foul of watchdog

(3 hours ago)
The UK Advertising Standards Authority bans a Dyson ad for implying fan is cordless.

Netflix Stock Tumbles After US Subscribers Drop For the First Time Ever

(3 hours ago)
Netflix saw its first-ever decline in paid U.S. subscribers in the second quarter, losing 126,000 U.S. users when Wall Street was expecting 352,000 domestic adds. Barron's reports: The slight drop in Netflix's U.S. subscriber base, combined with fewer-than expected international adds in the second quarter, sent the company's stock tumbling over 10% in after-hours trading Wednesday. The streaming company still reported better-than-expected earnings, but investors tend to focus on its subscriber trends and not much else. The company said it sees a return to subscriber growth in the third quarter. For the second quarter, Netflix reported 60 cents in earnings per share, versus the 56 cents analysts had been expecting. Revenue came in at $4.9 billion, about equal to the consensus estimate. That compares with 85 cents in earnings per share on $3.9 billion in sales in the same period last year. Second-quarter net income was $270.7 million. But Netflix's subscriber numbers tend to be the most important metric for investors, and Netflix fell short where it mattered. It added 2.8 million net new international subscribers but lost 126,000 U.S. users in the second quarter. Wall Street had been expecting 352,000 domestic and 4.8 million international adds, and Netflix had guided to a total of 5.0 million new subscribers. For the third quarter, Netflix "calls for $1.04 in EPS, $5.3 billion in revenue, and for user numbers to return to growth to the tune of 800,000 new domestic subscribers[..]

Qualcomm set to face second EU antitrust fine shortly: sources

(3 hours ago)
Qualcomm, the world's no.1 chipmaker, could be hit with a second EU antitrust fine as soon as Thursday for blocking a rival from the market more than a decade ago, people familiar with the matter said.

Explainer: What is the EU's antitrust investigation into Amazon about?

(3 hours ago)
The European Commission has opened a formal antitrust investigation to assess whether Amazon's use of sensitive data from independent retailers who sell on its marketplace is in breach of EU competition rules.

Juventus to be called Piemonte Calcio in Fifa after PES deal

(3 hours ago)
Fifa 20 will be the first game in 25 years not to feature the licence for Serie A champions Juventus.

Google's Project Dragonfly 'Terminated' In China

(3 hours ago)
An executive at Google said the company's plan to launch a censored search engine in China has been "terminated." The project was reportedly put on hold last year but rumors that it remained active persisted. From a report: "We have terminated Project Dragonfly," Google executive Karan Bhatia told the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee. Buzzfeed, which reported the new comments, said it was the first public confirmation that Dragonfly had ended. A spokesman for Google later confirmed to the site that Google currently had no plans to launch search in China and that no work was being done to that end.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Consensus among G7 ministers to tackle Facebook's Libra: French chair

(3 hours ago)
G7 ministers meeting in France on Wednesday agreed on the need to confront the emergence of digital currencies following Facebook's plans to launch its Libra digital coin, a French G7 presidency source said on Wednesday.

Moon hoax? Five reasons why the landings were real

(3 hours ago)
Conspiracy theories surround the Moon landings but BBC Click seeks to dispel some of the myths.

Making the Case For a Microsoft Surface Phone That Runs Android

(3 hours ago)
Zac Bowden from Windows Central makes the case for why Microsoft may want to make a Surface phone that runs Android. An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from the report: While a Surface Phone running Android would never sell to the quantity that Samsung smartphones do (or at least not a first- or second-generation phone), Microsoft could utilize the Surface brand to showcase the best of Microsoft's Android efforts all in one place, just like it has done for Windows PCs. I'm picturing a Surface-branded, Microsoft-built smartphone that comes with Microsoft Launcher, Edge, Office, Your Phone phone-mirroring integration, and more, out of the box. In fact, that's one of four unique selling points that a Surface Phone running Android could have: -- Showcase the best of Microsoft's efforts on Android. -- Seamless integration with Windows PCs using Your Phone. -- Provide the best security and update support on Android. -- Brand recognition that can rival Apple and Samsung. That last point is more for Microsoft fans, but the first three are important. A Surface Phone running Android would be the only smartphone out there that's always guaranteed to work with all of Your Phone's features. I have a wide array of Android smartphones, yet 90 percent of them don't support all of Your Phone's features on Windows 10. Screen mirroring is only available on select devices, and while that may improve, there's no guarantee your smartphone will ever get it, or if it'll work well. Microsoft[..]

Amazon appeases German watchdog, but EU opens new probe

(3 hours ago)
Amazon has reached a deal with Germany's anti-trust authority to overhaul its terms of service for third-party merchants, acting to appease regulators as the European Union announced its own investigation of the e-commerce giant.

TurboTax Started Charging the Disabled, Unemployed and Students To Make Up For Trump Tax Law

(3 hours ago)
The 2017 tax overhaul directly threatened the lucrative business of Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, so it pushed students, the disabled, and unemployed to a paid tier to make up for the lost profits. ProPublica reports: Although the company draws in customers with the promise of a "free" product, its fortunes depend on getting as many customers as possible to pay. It had been regularly charging $100 or more for returns that included itemized deductions for mortgage interest and charitable donations. Under the new law, many wealthier taxpayers would no longer be filing that form, qualifying them to use the company's free software. Intuit executives came up with a way to preserve the company's hefty profit margins: It began charging more low-income people. Which ones? Individuals with disabilities, the unemployed and people who owe money on student loans, all of whom use tax forms that TurboTax previously included for free. The shift was described to ProPublica by two people familiar with the process. Because the new law almost doubled the standard deduction, Intuit faced a loss of users of its Deluxe edition. Most of the millions of Americans who would no longer be itemizing their deductions are relatively affluent -- making more than $75,000 a year -- but they would now potentially be eligible to use the Free Edition. In response, the company bumped a number of forms typically used by lower-income filers, which were previously available in the Free Edition, into paying[..]

Japan urges G7 to think beyond existing rules in dealing with Libra

(3 hours ago)
Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso on Wednesday urged his G7 counterparts to make a comprehensive assessment of Facebook Inc's Libra digital currency for any fresh challenges that could be overlooked by existing regulations.

Oakland Becomes Third US City To Ban Facial Recognition

(3 hours ago)
Oakland, California has followed San Francisco and Somerville, Massachusetts in banning the use of facial recognition in public spaces. Motherboard reports: A city ordinance passed Tuesday night which prohibits the city of Oakland from "acquiring, obtaining, retaining, requesting, or accessing" facial recognition technology, which it defines as "an automated or semi-automated process that assists in identifying or verifying an individual based on an individual's face." The ordinance amends a 2018 law which requires any city staff member to get approval from the chair of Oakland's Privacy Advisory Commission before "seeking or soliciting funds" for surveillance technology. State and federal funding for surveillance technology must also be approved by the chair, per the ordinance. According to a public memo by Rebecca Kaplan, Oakland City Council President, the ban was instituted on the basis that facial recognition is often inaccurate, lacks established ethical standards, is invasive in nature, and has a high potential for government abuse.Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Netflix shares plunge as global growth falls short, U.S. customers shrink

(3 hours ago)
Netflix Inc said on Wednesday it lost U.S. streaming customers for the first time in eight years and missed targets for new subscribers overseas, an announcement that jarred investors ahead of looming competition.

Huawei says Italy's new 5G powers discriminate against it

(3 hours ago)
Chinese telecoms equipment group Huawei Technologies criticised the Italian government's newly beefed-up powers to intervene in the development of fifth-generation (5G) telecom services, saying they discriminated against the company.

Politics of automation: Factory workers and robots

(3 hours ago)
Humans and robots working together in a factory may excite some tech geeks, but worry others who fear job losses.

Global drone market estimated to reach $14 billion over next decade: study

(3 hours ago)
The worldwide non-military drone market, dominated by manufacturers in China, will triple in size to $14.3 billion in sales over the next decade, a study released on Wednesday said, even as U.S. officials warn of national security risks.

California Awards $70 Million To State Schools To Replace 200 Polluting Diesel School Buses With All-Electric Buses

(3 hours ago)
The California Energy Commission has awarded nearly $70 million to state schools to replace more than 200 diesel school buses with new, all-electric school buses. Electrek reports: The commission approved the funding this week. A total of $89.8 million has now been earmarked for new electric buses at schools in 26 California counties, as the commission's School Bus Replacement Program works toward this goal. A study published in Economics of Education Review last month showed diesel retrofits had positive results on both respiratory health and test scores. Eliminating emissions from these buses completely will do even more to protect children from dangerous emissions while cutting air pollution. The new buses will eliminate nearly 57,000 pounds of nitrogen oxides, and nearly 550 pounds of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions annually. The exact number of buses going to California school districts is unclear -- the energy commission only says "more than 200." If the entirety of the $70 million went to just 200 buses, that'd be $350,000 per bus. But while the exact cost of each bus is unknown, the commission does estimate that "schools will save nearly $120,000 in fuel and maintenance costs per bus over 20 years." Some estimates have noted that electric school buses tend to cost about $120,000 more than diesel buses -- if that's the case here, the price will be equal in the end, with added health benefits. Funding for the electric buses is supplied by the voter-approved[..]

Esports: Trying to make millions through video gaming

(3 hours ago)
Top stars of esports, or competitive video gaming, can earn millions of dollars a year without breaking a sweat.

MercadoLibre preps to offer investment platform for e-wallet users

(3 hours ago)
MercadoLibre Inc, Latin America's top e-commerce platform, is taking its latest step into the world of banking, saying on Wednesday that it would start allowing Mexican users of its e-wallet to earn interest on money saved in its app by year-end.

'The Raspberry Pi 4 Needs a Fan'

(3 hours ago)
Author and programmer Jeff Geerling explains in a blog post why the new Raspberry Pi 4 needs a fan. Unlike previous Pis that didn't require a fan or heatsink to avoid CPU throttling, the Pi 4 is a different beast and "pretty much demands a fan," writes Geerling. "Not only does the CPU get appreciably hot even under normal load, there are a number of other parts of the board that heat up to the point they are uncomfortable to touch." After 5 minutes at idle, he recorded the CPU/System-on-a-Chip (SoC) was around 60C, and it climbed to the 60-70C range when using the USB ports. "[I]magine if you're truly using the Pi 4 as a desktop replacement, with at least one external USB 3.0 hard drive attached, WiFi connected and transferring large amounts of data, a USB keyboard and mouse, a few browser windows open (the average website these days might as well be an AAA video game with how resource-intense it is), a text editor, and a music player," writes Geerling. "This amount of load is enough to cause the CPU to throttle in less than 10 minutes." So, Geerling did what any programmer and DIYer would do and decided to add a fan himself to the official case -- and in addition to the blog post describing the process, he made a 22-minute-long video showing you what he did. From the post: Without any ventilation, it's kind of a little plastic oven inside the Pi 4 case. A heat sink might help in some tiny way, but that heat has nowhere to go! So I decided to follow the lead of Redditor[..]

German finance minister: Libra cryptocurrency must wait for regulatory clarity

(3 hours ago)
Facebook cannot go ahead with its plans to launch its digital coin Libra until all regulatory issues are dealt with, German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said on Wednesday as he met with counterparts from G7 countries.

Reef rescue: Could this robot help save corals?

(3 hours ago)
The submersible robot delivers baby corals to damaged areas allowing reefs to regenerate.

Cloud growth fuels IBM profit beat

(3 hours ago)
International Business Machines Corp beat analysts' estimates for second-quarter profit on Wednesday, propped up by recurring growth in its high-margin cloud business.

To Foil Hackers, 'Morpheus' Chip Can Change Its Code In the Blink of An Eye

(3 hours ago)
Todd Austin, a professor at the University of Michigan, is working on an approach known as Morpheus that aims to frustrate hackers trying to gain control of microchips by presenting them with a rapidly changing target. At a conference in Detroit this week organized by the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Austin described how the prototype Morpheus chip works. MIT Technology Review reports: The aim is to make it incredibly difficult for hackers to exploit key software that helps govern the chip's operation. Morpheus does this by repeatedly randomizing elements of the code that attackers need access to in order to compromise the hardware. This can be achieved without disrupting the software applications that are powered by the processor. Austin has been able to get the chip's code "churning" to happen once every 50 milliseconds -- way faster than needed to frustrate the most powerful automated hacking tools. So even if hackers find a vulnerability, the information needed to exploit it disappears in the blink of an eye. There's a cost to all this: the technology causes a slight drop in performance and requires somewhat bigger chips. The military may accept this trade-off in return for greater security on the battlefield, but it could limit Morpheus's appeal to businesses and consumers. Austin said a prototype has already resisted every known variant of a widely-used hacking technique known as a control-flow attack, which does things[..]

The toy-sized satellites with an eye on the world

(3 hours ago)
Small, cheap satellites can help us track pollution, crop yields and congestion like never before.

Facebook-Driven Area 51 Storming May Be Countered With Force, Says US Air Force

(3 days ago)
Fun and games on Facebook may have serious consequences for the foolish. That was the message delivered by the US Air Force, who have responded to a Facebook's group's efforts to have 450,000 people storm a top secret military base. From a report: Conspiracy theorists have always believed that Area 51 in Nevada holds information about extra-terrestrial activities on our planet, possibly including actual alien remains and aircraft. That belief spawned a Facebook group suggesting that a wave of humanity could overwhelm the defenses at the base and discover the truth. More than 400,000 people have joined a Facebook event page calling for storming Area 51, with many more indicating interest. The proposed event is scheduled for Sept. 20. "We will all meet up at the Area 51 Alien Center tourist attraction and coordinate our entry," the event description reads. "If we naruto run, we can move faster than their bullets. Lets see them aliens."Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Computer Pioneer and Codebreaker Alan Turing To Appear On UK Money

(3 days ago)
sandbagger writes: Computer pioneer and codebreaker Alan Turing will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's 50 pound note. He is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital to the Allies in World War Two. The 50 pound note will be the last of the Bank of England collection to switch from paper to polymer when it enters circulation by the end of 2021. The note was once described as the "currency of corrupt elites" and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million 50 pound notes in circulation, with a combined value of 17.2bn pound, according to the Bank of England's banknote circulation figures. "Alan Turing was an outstanding mathematician whose work has had an enormous impact on how we live today," said Bank of England governor Mark Carney.Read more of this story at Slashdot.
Add a source
Share |
| 1 |2 |3 |4 |5 |6 |




T:0.1083